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At first I'm sorry for my English:) So, I have a structure and variable

typedef struct
{
  GHEADER  m_Header;
  BYTE    *m_Buf;
  Addr    *m_Abonent;
}__attribute__((packed)) PACKET;

unsigned char* uc_ptr;

I need to send to some function unsigned char pointer argument. I tried to use reinterpret_cast to cast a pointer to PACKET type to unsigned char*.

PACKET* t_PACKET;
uc_ptr = reinterpret_cast<unsigned char*>(t_PACKET);

But then I tried

std::cout << *uc_ptr << std::endl;

I don't see anything. Why? And how to cast this correctly?

share|improve this question
3  
Because this most probably doesn't make much sense. This should be resolved using something else, casting is not for this purpose. – user529758 Nov 28 '12 at 20:24
1  
What are you expecting to see? – Pubby Nov 28 '12 at 20:24

When you use << to output a char you get a single character written to the output. Many characters such as \0 do not show up on the console.

Try this instead to see what I mean:

std::cout << static_cast<unsigned int>(*uc_ptr) << std::endl;

You'll need a loop to get all of the bytes in the structure.

share|improve this answer
    
I get 0. What does it mean?.. – user1861137 Nov 28 '12 at 20:42
1  
@user1861137, it means the first byte of your structure is zero, as I suspected. That's a NUL character which won't be displayed on the console. If you can be more explicit about what you're trying to accomplish I might be able to help some more. – Mark Ransom Nov 28 '12 at 20:48
    
How can I get all bytes in the structure? May be something like this while (i < sizeof(PACKET)){ std::cout << static_cast<unsigned int>(*uc_ptr) << std::endl; ++i; } but it isn't work. Only 0 – user1861137 Nov 28 '12 at 20:54
    
@user1861137, use uc_ptr[i] instead of *uc_ptr in your loop. – Mark Ransom Nov 28 '12 at 21:03
    
Oh, it's time to sleep... Thanks a lot! – user1861137 Nov 28 '12 at 21:10

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