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I know the following XML will not work, but is there any way to achieve this same effect?

....
<LinearLayout
    android:layout_width="match_parent * 5"
    android:layout_height="match_parent" />
....

To explain, the effect I'm trying to achieve is to make a child layout X times the size of it's parent layout, where X is a float. In the XML example, I used 5.

The effect I'm trying to create using this is to have a ScrollView be Y size and have it's content view be Y * X in size.

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3  
To achieve this you will have to write a custom layout (extends ViewGroup.) – Romain Guy Nov 28 '12 at 20:38
up vote 1 down vote accepted

As far as I know there is no way to achieve this through XML layout. You can add the following code in your activity in order to change the height of child view. Note that the size of the view is known once android has fininished activity layout. So you may add a listener to know when layout is ready and all sizes are known. I agree with Syed Zahid Ali that you can not fit larger child in smaller parent but as far as ScrollView is concerned this code should work:

final ViewGroup parentView = findViewById(R.id.parentView);
    final View childView = parentView.findViewById(R.id.childView);

    parentView.getViewTreeObserver().addOnGlobalLayoutListener(new ViewTreeObserver.OnGlobalLayoutListener() {
        @Override
        public void onGlobalLayout() {
            float parentHeight = parentView.getHeight();

            ViewGroup.LayoutParams params = childView.getLayoutParams();
            params.height = (int)(parentHeight * 5);

            childView.setLayoutParams(params);
            //We want the listener to be called only the first time(in case it is initialized in onCreate())  
            parentView.getViewTreeObserver().removeGlobalOnLayoutListener(this);
        }
    });
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This seems like the best alternative for me, however, the one difference between what I'm trying to do and what that code does is the childView. The childView, for me, is actually a ViewGroup (it is a LinearLayout). However, this code does not work with a ViewGroup apparently (but if I change the childView to target an arbitrary TextView, it works just fine). Any suggestions? – MikeS Nov 28 '12 at 21:37

How can you fit a child in smaller parent, it is not possible even through programming.

If you want so, first thing is your parent view must have "wrap_ content" property and if it is then you can not do X*5 thing.

So, what you are saying is not possible.

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4  
A child can be larger than its parent, it's how ScrollView works. – Romain Guy Nov 28 '12 at 20:38
    
Agree with Romain. That is actually the intended use of this: for easily setting up scrollview content views. – MikeS Nov 28 '12 at 20:44
    
I agree, but the visible area of child of ScrollView will always remain smaller than or equal to ScrollView. – Androider Nov 28 '12 at 20:48

If you know what the parent size will be, you can specify a px/dp/dip/sp value in layout_width for the child. I would actually recommend this approach because it's simpler and there's less of a chance of something exploding on you.

Otherwise, you can actually get the width/height in pixels after the parent view calls onDraw(). Someone said that getWidth and getHeight works on the onWindowFocusChanged call, which I have used successfully to measure views before.

You do risk a mess though, because if a child view is measuring the parent, the child view can expand, thus giving you a chance that the parent expands (though match_parent may prevent this). Then you resize the child to be larger than the parent, and then you measure the parent's size, which expanded. So, you then get caught in a loop of the child trying to be larger than the parent, and the parent resizing to accommodating the child, and the child expands even further.

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