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I have following code:

<?php
function calculate_string( $mathString )    {
   $mathString = trim($mathString);     // trim white spaces
   $mathString = preg_replace("/[^0-9\(\)\+\-\*\/\.]/", "", $mathString);       
   return eval("return $mathString;");   
 }

$string1 = " (1 + 1) *3+ (2 + 2)";
echo calculate_string($string1);
$string2 = " (1 + 1) *3+* (2 + 2)";
echo calculate_string($string2);
?>

function calculate_string() must calculate math expression given in string as a param. First call on string1 work good.

But, how I can detect if math. string have math. error in syntax like in seconda call, and return some value depends of error type, or simple return nothing(better solution)? So, problem is parse_error in second call when math expression contain errors in syntax.

Please help.

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closed as too localized by Jocelyn, hjpotter92, Fls'Zen, Freelancer, Soner Gönül May 25 '13 at 21:47

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1  
Why do you have have all those escapes in the regex? preg_replace('~[^0-9()*/.+-]~', '', $mathString) is exactly equivalent to what you have now, but much more readable. –  NullUserException Nov 28 '12 at 20:35
    
You should look into using a syntax highlighting text editor like Notepad++ or JEdit, will help you catch parse errors since it will break syntax highlighting at the source of the error. –  cryptic ツ Nov 28 '12 at 20:41
2  
"how I can detect if math. string have math. error in syntax" Write a proper parser instead of using eval(). –  NullUserException Nov 28 '12 at 20:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ok, so you'd like to sport something like *3+* in:

$string2 = " (1 + 1) *3+* (2 + 2)";

Well you can do this in many ways, by checking string yourself for some common errors or i.e. using your own (see set_error_handler()) to trap problems at runtime

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correct. edited. –  Marcin Orlowski Nov 28 '12 at 20:38
    
You can't use set_error_handler() to catch errors in eval'd code. Source: the docs –  NullUserException Nov 28 '12 at 23:54

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