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identifying or coding unique factors using R

I'm having some trouble with R.

I have a data set similar to the following, but much longer.

A B Pulse
1 2 23
2 2 24
2 2 12
2 3 25
1 1 65
1 3 45

Basically, the first 2 columns are coded. A has 1, 2 which represent 2 different weights. B has 1, 2, 3 which represent 3 different times.

As they are coded numerical values, R will treat them as numerical variables. I need to use the factor function to convert these variables into factors.

Help?

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marked as duplicate by Justin, mnel, Nik...., Firo, Mario Nov 29 '12 at 7:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers 2

Here's an example:

#Create a data frame
> d<- data.frame(a=1:3, b=2:4)
> d
  a b
1 1 2
2 2 3
3 3 4

#currently, there are no levels in the `a` column, since it's numeric as you point out.
> levels(d$a)
NULL

#Convert that column to a factor
> d$a <- factor(d$a)
> d
  a b
1 1 2
2 2 3
3 3 4

#Now it has levels.
> levels(d$a)
[1] "1" "2" "3"

You can also handle this when reading in your data. See the colClasses and stringsAsFactors parameters in e.g. readCSV().

Note that, computationally, factoring such columns won't help you much, and may actually slow down your program (albeit negligibly). Using a factor will require that all values are mapped to IDs behind the scenes, so any print of your data.frame requires a lookup on those levels -- an extra step which takes time.

Factors are great when storing strings which you don't want to store repeatedly, but would rather reference by their ID. Consider storing a more friendly name in such columns to fully benefit from factors.

share|improve this answer
    
But each of the numbers represents something. For A, 1 represents long, and 2 represents short. For B, 1 2 3 represents, 1kg, 2kg, 3kg So I need to convert all those 1's, 2's etc into the 1kg, 2kg, long, short etc. I need to add labels to them. –  math11 Nov 28 '12 at 20:51
    
Try running the code above followed by assigning the levels value to something more useful. For instance, levels(d$a) <- c("Long", "Short"). Now you (or a new user looking at your code) needn't worry about memorizing the mappings between your IDs and your labels. R will handle the mapping for you and just present the labels to you. –  Jeff Allen Nov 28 '12 at 21:00

sample data

myData <- data.frame(A=rep(1:2, 3), B=rep(1:3, 2), Pulse=20:25)



myData$A <-as.factor(myData$A)
myData$B <-as.factor(myData$B)

or you could select your columns altogether and wrap it up nicely:

# select columns
cols <- c("A", "B")
myData[,cols] <- data.frame(apply(myData[cols], 2, as.factor))

levels(myData$A) <- c("long", "short")
levels(myData$B) <- c("1kg", "2kg", "3kg")

eg:

> myData
      A   B Pulse
1  long 1kg    20
2 short 2kg    21
3  long 3kg    22
4 short 1kg    23
5  long 2kg    24
6 short 3kg    25
share|improve this answer
    
But each of the numbers represents something. For A, 1 represents long, and 2 represents short. For B, 1 2 3 represents, 1kg, 2kg, 3kg. –  math11 Nov 28 '12 at 20:49
    
take a look at ?levels –  Ricardo Saporta Nov 28 '12 at 20:55
    
On the example that you've given, it goes long short long short ....., but my data is isn't 1 2 1 2 1 2...... actually ignore this, it works! cheers –  math11 Nov 28 '12 at 20:59
    
yes haha, sorry. –  math11 Nov 28 '12 at 21:01
    
thank you so much! –  math11 Nov 28 '12 at 21:02

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