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I've been playing with this code for almost half of the day and I finally decided to pass it on to you. I would like to place three div elements next to each other with the left and right ones surrounding the main one. I would like both of the outer divs to contain only a background image and hence take on the same height as the middle div. I've been playing with solutions from other posts like this, but all of my tries were unsuccessful.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="pl" lang="pl">
<head>  
</head>
<body>
<div id="container">
    <div id="left"></div>
    <div id="content">
        <p> Lorem ipsum dolor<br/><br/>sit amet<br/><br/>consectetur adipiscing elit</p>
    </div>
    <div id="right"></div>
</div>
</body>

CSS:

body {
    text-align: center;
}

div#container {
    width: 954px;
    margin: 0px auto;
    height: 100%;
    border: 1px solid lime;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: relative;
}

div#left {
    margin: 0px auto;
    width: 5px;
    border: 1px solid red;
    float: left;
    display: block;
}

div#right {
    margin: 0px auto;
width: 5px;
float: left;
border: 1px solid blue;
}

div#content {
    width: 920px;
    margin: 0px auto;
    text-align: left;
    background: #ffffff;
    padding: 0px 10px;
    float: left;
}
p {
    font: normal 16px/18px 'Trebuchet MS', Helvetica, sans-serif;
    margin: 20px 0px;
}

Thanks in advance for your help.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You'll need to add height: 100% to your body and html tags, as well as your div classes:

html {
    height: 100%; /* <------------ */
}

body {
    text-align: center;
    height: 100%; /* <------------ */
}

div#container {
    width: 954px;
    margin: 0px auto;
    height: 100%;
    border: 1px solid lime;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: relative;
}

div#left {
    margin: 0px auto;
    width: 5px;
    border: 1px solid red;
    float: left;
    display: block;
    height: 100%; /* <------------ */
}

div#right {
    margin: 0px auto;
    width: 5px;
    float: left;
    border: 1px solid blue;
    height: 100%; /* <------------ */
}

div#content {
    width: 920px;
    margin: 0px auto;
    text-align: left;
    background: #ffffff;
    padding: 0px 10px;
    float: left;
    height: 100%; /* <------------ */
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, the outer divs are longer now. But when I put longer content (i.e. that requires scrolling) into the middle div, all of the divs appear to take on the size of the screen, not the content. Any possible fix for that? –  MartinUKPL Nov 28 '12 at 22:26
    
eek -- you could try min-height: 100% instead of height: 100% (or add overflow-y: scroll to your div#content CSS) –  Kevin Boucher Nov 28 '12 at 22:52

I know this doesn't really answer your question, but I tend to prefer a method that uses position:relative on the parent and position:absolute on the capping elements. This guarantees that a dynamically changing box will not throw off your layout. I also like to use the :before :after attributes (IE 8+) because of semantic reasons, but you can use child elements instead. Works just as fine. I also threw in box-sizing (FF needs -moz syntax) so the borders don't look fugly. (probably not necessary in a production setting as your would be using a background instead).

And now, the code!

CSS

div#container:before {
    content:"";
    width: 5px;
    border: 1px solid red;
    display: block;
    position:absolute;
    height:100%;
    left:0px;
    top:0px;
    box-sizing:border-box; /* careful... FF needs -moz if you need that compatibility */
}

div#container:after {
    content:"";
    width: 5px;
    border: 1px solid blue;
    display: block;
    position:absolute;
    height:100%;
    right:0px;
    top:0px;
    box-sizing:border-box;
}

HTML

<div id="container">
    <div id="content">
        <p> Lorem ipsum dolor<br/><br/>sit amet<br/><br/>consectetur adipiscing elit</p>
    </div>
</div>

DEMO

http://jsfiddle.net/f7yL6/
http://jsfiddle.net/f7yL6/show

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Media queries can be used to achieve most of what % offers without any of the pain. It's not as smooth but when used for intro banners it is perfectly acceptable.

Using mobile declarations first you would use something like this.

.banner { height: 200px; }

@media all and (min-width: 500px) {
  .banner { height: 400px; }
}

@media all and (min-width: 1000px) {
  .banner { height: 500px; }
}

Edit: I used min-width but min-height can also be used. To really get things to look good on all sort of devices, a mix of min-width and min-height would need to be used.

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