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I was reviewing some code, and I found something that looked like this:

public class MyClass
{
    public bool IsEditable { get; set; }

    public void HandleInput()
    {
        if (IsEditable.Equals(false))
        {
            //do stuff
        }
    }
}

As far as I know, (IsEditable.Equals(false)) is identical to (IsEditable == false) (and also the same as (!IsEditable)).

Besides personal preference, is there any difference at all between .Equals() and ==, specifically when used to compare bools?

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1  
Just speculation: maybe it was ported from Java where == and .Equals have different meanings? EDIT: or as Mike Petty pointed out, perhaps it was written by a long-time Java developer who is used to writing Equals normally. –  Chris Sinclair Nov 28 '12 at 21:39
    
Possible Duplicate: C#: String.Equals vs. == –  Ryan Gates Nov 28 '12 at 22:06
1  
When x is an expression of type (non-nullable) bool, I never compare to true or false. It is easier to use just x instead of x == true or x.Equals(true) or x != false, and easier to use !x instead of x == false or x.Equals(false) or x != true. And so on. With two non-constant bool expressions, I use the C# built-in operators rather than Equals, for example I would use x == y or x != y (sometimes even x ^ y). However with nullable booleans, for example bool? z, I might use z == false. It has the same value as (z.HasValue && !z.Value). –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 10 at 10:26

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The Equals way appears to be significantly slower - roughly 2.7 times in debug mode, and more than seven times in release mode.

Here is my quick and dirty benchmark:

public static void Main() {
    bool a = bool.Parse("false");
    bool b = bool.Parse("true");
    bool c = bool.Parse("true");
    var sw = new Stopwatch();
    const int Max = 1000000000;
    int count = 0;
    sw.Start();
    // The loop will increment count Max times; let's measure how long it takes
    for (int i = 0; i != Max; i++) {
        count++;
    }
    sw.Stop();
    var baseTime = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;
    sw.Start();
    count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i != Max; i++) {
        if (a.Equals(c)) count++;
        if (b.Equals(c)) count++;
    }
    sw.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine(sw.ElapsedMilliseconds - baseTime);
    sw.Reset();
    count = 0;
    sw.Start();
    for (int i = 0; i != Max; i++) {
        if (a==c) count++;
        if (b==c) count++;
    }
    sw.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine(sw.ElapsedMilliseconds - baseTime);
    sw.Reset();
    count = 0;
    sw.Start();
    for (int i = 0; i != Max; i++) {
        if (!a) count++;
        if (!b) count++;
    }
    sw.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine(sw.ElapsedMilliseconds - baseTime);
}

Running this produces the following results:

In debug mode

8959
2950
1874

In release mode

5348
751
7

Equals appears to be the slowest. There appears to be little difference between == and !=. However, if (!boolExpr) appears to be the clear winner.

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1  
See my answer (stackoverflow.com/a/13615362/128709) for the explanation why Equals is the slowest. –  Oliver Hanappi Nov 28 '12 at 22:20

This is mostly a readability issue. I'd normally use == because that's what I'm used to looking at.

Specifically with bools, you don't have to compare them at all

if(!IsEditable)

will suffice

although, Sometimes I myself do write things like if (val == false) just to be extra sure that i don't misread it when i have to modify the code.

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In fact, for basic types such as int, bool etc. there is a difference between calling Equals() and == due to the fact that the CIL has instructions for handling such types. Calling Equals() forces boxing of the value and making a virtual method call, whereas usage of == leads to usage of a single CIL instruction.

!value and value == false is actually the same, at least in Microsoft's C# compiler bundled with .NET 4.0.

Hence, the comparisons within the following methods

public static int CompareWithBoxingAndVirtualMethodCall(bool value)
{
    if (value.Equals(false)) { return 0; } else { return 1; }
}

public static int CompareWithCILInstruction(bool value)
{
    if (value == false) { return 0; } else { return 1; }
    if (!value) { return 0; } else { return 1; } // comparison same as line above
}

will compile to to the following CIL instructions:

// CompareWithBoxingAndVirtualMethodCall

ldarga.s 'value'
ldc.i4.0
call instance bool [mscorlib]System.Boolean::Equals(bool) // virtual method call
brfalse.s IL_000c // additional boolean comparison, jump for if statement

// CompareWithCILInstruction

ldarg.0
brtrue.s IL_0005 // actual single boolean comparison, jump for if statement
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1  
This potentially impacts performance (and it will almost always be by a negligible amount) but won't ever impact the result of the expression. (Just for those types listed.) –  Servy Nov 28 '12 at 22:39

If you decompile System.Boolean and look at it, It's Equals overloads are defined thus:

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
  if (!(obj is bool))
    return false;
  else
    return this == (bool) obj;
}

public bool Equals(bool obj)
{
  return this == obj;
}

I would like to think the C# compiler's optimizer and the .Net JIT compiler would be smart enough to inline these, at least for release/optimized compilations, making them exactly the same.

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Take a look at the following quote Taken from here:

The Equals method is just a virtual one defined in System.Object, and overridden by whichever classes choose to do so. The == operator is an operator which can be overloaded by classes, but which usually has identity behaviour.

For reference types where == has not been overloaded, it compares whether two references refer to the same object - which is exactly what the implementation of Equals does in System.Object.

So in short, Equals is really just doing a == anyways.

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In this case, with bools, it doesn't make any difference, however with other built-in non reference types it can.

== allows for conversions of types if it can .Equals won't

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There are quite a few differences between operator == and Equals in the general case, none of which apply to bool. The one reason that you gave isn't one of those many reasons; operator == doesn't convert anything. –  Servy Nov 28 '12 at 21:47
2  
try doing 1 == 1.0 it will do that comparison just fine, but 1.Equals(1.0) won't... –  Keith Nicholas Nov 28 '12 at 21:53
    
operator == isn't converting anything. It's effectively just a method, like any other. It's signature is simply specific enough such that no overload of it will match 1 == 1.0 exactly, it will only match operator == (double first, double second) and the compiler will notice that as the closest match, and also that there is an implicit conversion from int to double. If you used a method with a signature Equals(double first, double second) and then called Equals(1, 1.0) it would compile and return true. –  Servy Nov 28 '12 at 22:02
    
try again, this time when explaining it doesn't convert anything, don't say that it converts something to get its job done. –  Keith Nicholas Nov 28 '12 at 22:09
    
operator == doesn't convert anything though, that's my point. The C# compiler is doing the conversion as a result of finding the proper overload. If the signature of Equals didn't already cover everything (being object and object) it would do the same. Using operator == allows the compiler to perform implicit conversions while Equals does not, but the operator itself still isn't doing any converting. It's an important difference. There is no code, whatsoever, within the definition of operator == that is converting any types. –  Servy Nov 28 '12 at 22:12

== is always better than .Equals. In the case of integer comparison, == runs faster than .Equals. In the below test, the elapsed time using == 157, while for .Equals the elapsed time is 230.

class Program
 {        
   static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        Program programObj = new Program();
            programObj.mymethod();
            programObj.mynextmethod();

    }
    void mynextmethod()
    {
        var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

        for (int i = 0; i < 60000000; i++)
        {
            int j = 0;
            if (i.Equals(j))

                j = j + 1;
        }
        watch.Stop();
        var elapsedMs = watch.ElapsedMilliseconds;
        Console.WriteLine("Time take in method" + elapsedMs);


        Console.ReadLine();
    }
    void mymethod()
    {
        var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

        for (int i = 0; i < 60000000; i++)
        {
            int j = 0;
            if (i == j)

                j = j + 1;
        }
        watch.Stop();
        var elapsedMs = watch.ElapsedMilliseconds;
        Console.WriteLine("Time take in method" + elapsedMs);
    }
}
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1  
This isn't an integer comparison. It's a boolean comparison. –  Servy Aug 27 at 16:24

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