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Lets say i want to resize an array of int pointers, i have a function that looks like this

    template<typename T>
static void Resize(T* arr, UINT oldsize, UINT newsize) {
    T* ret = new T [newsize];
    memcpy(ret, arr, sizeof(arr[0]) * oldsize);
    delete[] arr;   
    arr = ret;
};

The problems begin when i try and resize an array of elements that were created with the "new" keyword (even though the data itself inside the class is POD) because the delete[] triggers their deconstructor which then leaves the new array with pointers to objects that dont exist anymore. So.. even though the objects were created with "new", cant i just use the free command to get rid of the old array? or somehow delete the array without triggering the deconstructor of each member?

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5  
This would work fine if arr was declared T*& arr (assuming T is trivially-copyable and has a noexcept default constructor). –  ildjarn Nov 28 '12 at 23:21
2  
If you are going to be writing potentially dangerous code like this then just use malloc and free. Your code cannot handle non-trivial types because of the memcpy so there's not much point in using new and delete. –  Pubby Nov 28 '12 at 23:23
3  
@Pubby: Or we can suggest std::copy so that it's done properly, rather than more improperly. –  Lightning Racis in Obrit Nov 28 '12 at 23:25
    
the delete[] triggers their deconstructor which then leaves the new array with pointers to objects that dont exist anymore - No; the delete[] destroys the original pointers, not the ints they pointed to. –  Lightning Racis in Obrit Nov 28 '12 at 23:26
2  
I switched to vectors, was easier then i thought. Also got to cut out 3/4 of my code since apparently most of it was spent on managing arrays T_T –  Jake Freelander Nov 29 '12 at 1:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use a std::vector.


EDIT: by popular demand, an explanation of why the OP's code does not work.

The code:

template<typename T>
static void Resize(T* arr, UINT oldsize, UINT newsize) {
    T* ret = new T [newsize];
    memcpy(ret, arr, sizeof(arr[0]) * oldsize);
    delete[] arr;   
    arr = ret;
};

Here arr is a pointer passed by value. Assigning to arr at the end only updates the local copy of the actual argument. So after this the actual argument, in the calling code, points to an array that has been deleted, whith pretty catastrophic result!

It could be sort of rescued by passing that pointer by reference:

template<typename T>
static void Resize(T*& arr, UINT oldsize, UINT newsize) {
    T* ret = new T [newsize];
    memcpy(ret, arr, sizeof(arr[0]) * oldsize);
    delete[] arr;   
    arr = ret;
};

But this is still pretty fragile code.

For example, the caller needs to keep track of the array size.

With a std::vector called a, the resize call would instead look like

a.resize( newSize )

and in contrast to the DIY solution, when newSize is larger, those extra elements of the vector are nulled (which is a bit safer than leaving them as indeterminate values).

A std::vector can be indexed just like a raw array. See your C++ textbook about more details of how to use it. If you don't already have a C++ textbook, do get one: for most people it's just an impractical proposition to learn C++ from articles and Q/A on the web.

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5  
Ok, I'm a new downvoter and here's why I gave you -1; you didn't answer the question. This is obviously someone without much experience, perhaps a beginner. "Use a vector" is garbage advice in and of itself because it does not help the OP understand how his code works. I don't want to work with people who don't understand how pointers and dynamic memory allocation work because they were always told to "use a vector". It is good advice (with an explanation) to be given after you answer the question, but you should answer the question first. –  Ed S. Nov 28 '12 at 23:49
5  
I'm not sure what you mean by that. All I'm saying is that I see advice like "use a vector" handed out to beginners without an explanation far too often. They need to understand why you would use a vector over an array in the first place, what problems it solves, etc. Without understanding why the abstraction exists in the first place they're just writing cargo cult code and will never be able to tackle truly difficult, lower level problems in their software. –  Ed S. Nov 28 '12 at 23:53
3  
@Cheersandhth.-Alf: I don't know if you're an extremely stubborn, arrogant guy or beeing hacked by a troll. If you insist on that beeing a "perfect" answer, you're very wrong. If you add a good explanation why the OP should switch to a std::vector it would be tolerable to ignore the fact that you didn't even try to answer the actual question. –  stefan Nov 29 '12 at 0:07
3  
Exactly my point -- I'm not making an argument, merely an observation that every post you make seems to invite hostility. You took that observation and turned it into some sort of accusation. Amazing. –  ildjarn Nov 29 '12 at 0:09
3  
@Cheersandhth.-Alf: Quoting from the OP: "i want to resize an array of int pointers". I think that makes it very clear that he doesn't use a std::vector and looks for a solution for his problem with pointers. I didn't say that std::vector isn't a solution, it surely is! But in this form, it is an extremely bad answer and nonetheless doesn't directly answer the question. –  stefan Nov 29 '12 at 0:15

For what it's worth, what you're trying to do isn't a terribly bad thing, and there are times it makes sense, but it's simply not supported by the interface provided by new and delete (or new[] and delete[]). As others have said, it is supported by malloc, free, and realloc (with the caveat that realloc will copy the pointer values on reallocation, but won't guarantee that the pointers in the new area are initialized to anything useful, like NULL).

So, without further ado, the easiest answer that will work for almost everybody is to use a std::vector<int> instead of trying to manage the memory yourself. The vector has the ability to resize, and when it does it will copy things that need copying. std::vector exists to provide a "resizable array" and manage the memory for you. Actually, if you want a container of pointers, you're best off using either a std::vector<std::unique_ptr<T>>/std::vector<std::shared_ptr<T>> (in C++11) or something from Boost Pointer Container.

For what it's worth, the original STL did not use new[] or delete[] to implement std::vector<T>. Often, the operating system gives far more memory than you ask for. For instance, if I try to malloc 16 bytes, the block I get back may well be 1024 bytes. I can use that to store four 32 bit integers. When I run out of space, I may ask for 32 bytes, and get a different block of 1024 bytes, which I can copy my four integers to. But why go through the trouble of asking for a new block to hold my integers, when the original block was actually large enough to begin with? Unfortunately, new[] and delete[] don't provide a way to say "give me a block that's at least this large, and by the way here's a block that might already be big enough." realloc kind of does. Facebook Folly includes a std::vector-like container that doesn't use new[] or delete[] (note that it doesn't use realloc either, because that usually won't work with containers of objects; instead it uses malloc and the non-standard function malloc_usable_size), and Firefox goes through the trouble to manage memory in a similar manner.

Even so, I would discourage trying to get tricky. std::vector has a lot of satisfied users.

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I think that making all elements in array point to NULL before deleting should do the job. But if you can use STL then std::vector would make your life much easier (as Alf suggested :P).

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The problem i have with this is that i have a class A, i cant seem to add std::vector<A*> to the class, it says "no members defined using this type" –  Jake Freelander Nov 29 '12 at 0:28
    
@JakeFreelander, you'll need to show us some code on your efforts to use std::vector<A*> as a member. It certainly can be done, so it's simply a question of getting the syntax right. –  Max Lybbert Nov 29 '12 at 0:45
    
i got it working, im new to vectors though, do i need to delete the vector in deconstructor? –  Jake Freelander Nov 29 '12 at 0:56
    
@JakeFreelander: no, you don't need to delete the std::vector. It will destry itself when it falls out of scope. –  Max Lybbert Nov 29 '12 at 1:10

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