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I've been learning via jQuery how to shorten things up. I was wondering if this script can be expressed in a less verbose way? I don't like how everything sits on one huge line.

   items.push('<li id="' + key + '">' + ' (key: ' + key + ')(value: ' + val.value +         ')(type: ' + val.type + ') (range: ' + val.range + ') (clone: ' + val.clone + ') (archive: ' + val.archive + ') (access: ' + val.access + ')</li>')
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2  
Here you go -> FIDDLE -> most excellent solution ? –  adeneo Nov 28 '12 at 23:22
    
You could build the string on multiple lins in a variable and items.push(myBigString); –  jchapa Nov 28 '12 at 23:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assuming that the object will always have the correct key/values:

str = '';
for (var item in val) {
   str += '(' + item + ': ' + val[item] + ')';
}
$("<li>").attr('id', key).text(' (key: ' + key + ')' + str);

http://jsfiddle.net/36Nyu/

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Ohhhhh -- slick –  Adam Rackis Nov 28 '12 at 23:26
1  
This assumes val only holds these properties. You should also use val.hasOwnProperty(i); –  Kurt Nov 28 '12 at 23:29
    
@Kurt yes that assumption has to be made; why do you need hasOwnProperty? –  Explosion Pills Nov 28 '12 at 23:30
    
So it doesn't look up the prototype chain, it's always better to be more explicit, in case there's a nasty Object.prototype.customFunc in there somewhere ;) –  Kurt Nov 28 '12 at 23:36
1  
@ExplosionPills: You don't have to make any assumptions at all, because you have hasOwnProperty. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 29 '12 at 0:24

If items is another element, you can do something like this.

var str;

for(var i in val)
    str += '('+ i +': '+ val[i] +')';

$('<li>', {
    id: key,
    text: str
}).appendTo(items);
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This assumes val only holds these properties. You should also use val.hasOwnProperty(i); –  Kurt Nov 28 '12 at 23:27

You could use jquery tmpl, or similar:

var template = '(key: ' + key + ')(value: {{value}})(type: {{type}}) (range: {{range}}) (clone: {{clone}}) (archive: {{archive}}) (access: {{access}})';
$('<li />').attr('id', key).html($.tmpl(template, val));

Or, use a string.Format equivalent:

String.prototype.format = function () {
    var args = arguments;
    return this.replace(/\{\{|\}\}|\{(\d+)\}/g, function (m, n) {
        /* Allow escaping of curly brackets with {{ or }} */
        if (m === '{{') { return '{'; } else if (m === '}}') { return '}'; }
        return typeof args[n] != 'undefined' ? args[n] : '{' + n + '}';
    });
};
var text = '(key: {0})(value: {1})(type: {2}) (range: {3}) (clone: {4}) (archive: {5}) (access: {6})'.format(key, val.type, val.range, val.clone, val.archive, val.access);
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Assuming you're appending all of the key/value pairs in the val object, doing something like this would be pretty maintainable:

var liPrefix = '<li id="' + key + '">(key: ' + key + ')',
    liSuffix = '</li>',
    liData = '';

$.each(val, function(k, v) {
    liData += ' (' + k + ': ' + v + ')';
});

items.push(liPrefix + liData + liSuffix);

See demo

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