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I have the following data frame (simplified) with the country variable as a factor and the value variable has missing values:

country value
AUT     NA
AUT     5
AUT     NA
AUT     NA
GER     NA
GER     NA
GER     7
GER     NA
GER     NA

The following generates the above data frame:

data <- data.frame(country=c("AUT", "AUT", "AUT", "AUT", "GER", "GER", "GER", "GER", "GER"), value=c(NA, 5, NA, NA, NA, NA, 7, NA, NA))

Now, I would like to replace the NA values in each country subset using the method last observation carried forward (LOCF). I know the command na.locf in the zoo package. data <- na.locf(data) would give me the following data frame:

country value
AUT     NA
AUT     5
AUT     5
AUT     5
GER     5
GER     5
GER     7
GER     7
GER     7

However, the function should only be used on the individual subsets split by the country. The following is the output I would need:

country value
AUT     NA
AUT     5
AUT     5
AUT     5
GER     NA
GER     NA
GER     7
GER     7
GER     7

I can't think of an easy way to implement it. Before starting with for-loops, I was wondering if anyone has any idea as to how to solve this.

Many thanks!!

share|improve this question
    
You might get a quicker response if you edited your question to include a reasonable test data structure. –  BondedDust Nov 29 '12 at 0:53
    
You want zoo::na.locf() ! –  smci Sep 19 at 22:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here's a ddply solution. Try this

library(plyr)
ddply(DF, .(country), na.locf)
  country value
1     AUT  <NA>
2     AUT     5
3     AUT     5
4     AUT     5
5     GER  <NA>
6     GER  <NA>
7     GER     7
8     GER     7
9     GER     7

Edit From ddply help you can find that

.variables:  variables to split data frame by, 
as quoted variables, a formula or character vector.

so another alternatives to get what you want are:

ddply(DF, "country", na.locf)
ddply(DF, ~country, na.locf)

note that replacing .variables with DF$variable is not allowed, that's why you got an error when doing this.

DF is your data.frame

share|improve this answer
    
Amazing, thanks! Exactly what I needed. I tried ddply before, using ddply(DF, DF$country, na.locf) and that didn't work. What is the difference in using the .() notation? –  rp1 Nov 29 '12 at 1:52
    
@rp1 see my edit. –  Jilber Nov 29 '12 at 8:45

You simply need to split by country, then a do either a zoo::na.locf() or na.fill, filling to the right. Here is an example explicitly showing the three-component arg syntax of na.fill:

library(plyr)
library(zoo)

data <- data.frame(country=c("AUT", "AUT", "AUT", "AUT", "GER", "GER", "GER", "GER", "GER"), value=c(NA, 5, NA, NA, NA, NA, 7, NA, NA))

# The following is equivalent to na.locf
na.fill.right <- function(...) { na.fill(..., list(left=NA,interior=NA,right="extend")) }

ddply(data, .(country), na.fill.right)

  country value
1     AUT  <NA>
2     AUT     5
3     AUT     5
4     AUT     5
5     GER  <NA>
6     GER  <NA>
7     GER     7
8     GER     7
9     GER     7
share|improve this answer
    
@Gregor, so OP also wanted to split by country, I missed that and the na.locf mention, they were buried in the third paragraph. Works perfectly now. Normally the title and first paragraph should specify the question, I don't see why you didn't fix those up, I just did now. Any of you could and should have corrected that in the last 1.5 years. You can remove your downvote now. –  smci Sep 21 at 0:21

Modern version of the ddply solution is dplyr:

library(dplyr)
DF %>% group_by(county) %>% mutate(value = na.locf(value))
share|improve this answer

Split the data.frame with by and use na.locf on the subsets:

do.call(rbind,by(data,data$country,na.locf))

If you would like to remove the row names:

do.call(rbind,unname(by(data,data$country,na.locf)))
share|improve this answer
    
do.call and by work well together. –  Matthew Lundberg Nov 29 '12 at 1:51
    
Thanks, that works as well. However, I would have to rename the row names again to seq_len(nrow(data)). Therefore, I chose the above answer. However, your solution might be computationally faster, since ddply seems to be quite slow with large datasets. –  rp1 Nov 29 '12 at 1:55
    
Nice base solution :D +1 –  Jilber Nov 29 '12 at 8:50

If speed is a consideration then this unstack/stack solution is about 4 to 6 times faster than the others on my system although it does entail a slightly longer line of code:

stack(lapply(unstack(data, value ~ country), na.locf, na.rm = FALSE))
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