Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Im trying a simple example of the usage of a generic comparison-function in c but when initializing it I get the warning message that the types are incompatible when initializing them. Feels as I am missing something basic here...

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int
compare(int (*comp)(void *first, void *second), void *arr, int size)
{
    int i, j, dups=0, arrsize=sizeof(arr)/size;
    for(i=0; i<arrsize; i++)
    {
        for(j=0; j<arrsize; j++)
        {
            if(j!=i)
                dups+=(*comp)(&arr[i], &arr[j]);
        }  
    }
     return dups;
}

int
compareints(int *first, int *second)
{
    if(*first==*second)
        return 1;
    return 0;
}

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    int (*comp)(void *, void *)=&compareints; //Here is where I get the warning...
    int arr[10]={22, 39, 78, 22, 99, 12, 82, 10, 11, 28};
    printf("The arr has dups: %d\n", compare(comp, arr, sizeof(int)));
    return 0;
}

EDIT: the program was not functioning properly and it had to do with the handling of the array. The modifications for functioning prog are below:

int
compare(int (*comp)(void *first, void *second), void **arr, int size)
    ....
    ....
    ....
    dups+=(*comp)(arr[i], arr[j]);

int 
compareints(....)
    if((*((int *)first))==(*((int *)second)))
       return 1;


int 
main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
     int (*comp)(void *, void *)=&compareints;
     int arr[10]={22, 39, 78, 22, 99, 12, 82, 10, 11, 28};
     void **arr2=malloc(sizeof(int *)*10);
     for(int i=0; i<10; i++)
     {
         arr2[i]=&arr[i];
     }
     printf("The arr has dups: %d\n", compare(comp, arr2, 10));
     return 0;
}
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Unfortunately you can't mix void * and int * like this when they're part of a function signature. Even though int * can be converted to void *, int (*)(int *, int *) can't be converted to int (*)(void *, void *). The signatures have to match exactly.

int
compareints(void *first, void *second)
{
    if (*((int *) first) == *((int *) second))
        return 1;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi @John Kugelman, you where right, the warning disappeared. But one thing bewilders me: Is this the case for all pointers or only for int pointers when passed as void *? – patriques Nov 29 '12 at 1:16
    
@patriques It's nothing to do with pointers, it's the rule for function pointers. Function pointers are only compatible if their parameter types and return type match exactly. – John Kugelman Nov 29 '12 at 1:20
    
thanks, that makes sense. :-) – patriques Nov 29 '12 at 1:28

The type of:

int compareints(int *first, int *second)

is not equivalent to:

int (*comp)(void *first, void *second)

You must change the signature of the function to take in two void * parameters, or typecast it during assignment.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.