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I'm probably misunderstanding something fundamental about the Play Framework (2.x), but both the documentation about accessing an ordinary SQL database and the project samples doing so, does not seem to do this asynchronously.

There are no Promise<Result>, no Akka stuff etc.

Are you not blocking the main server thread if you do a database query with for example the ordinary MySQL JDBC driver? What am I missing?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

AFAIK, if you are looking at the "computer-database" sample, you are totally right, it blocks the main thread since the actions are not executed asynchronously.

Here is an extract from the sample:

public static Result list(int page, String sortBy, String order, String filter) {
    return ok(
        list.render(
            Computer.page(page, 10, sortBy, order, filter),
            sortBy, order, filter
        )
    );
}

Here, the Computer.page() is doing some JDBC blocking calls.

If you'd want to do it asynchronously, you should enclose the database call in an async(F.Promise<Result>) call. Something like this:

public static Result list(int page, String sortBy, String order, String filter) {
    return async(
            Akka.future(
                new Callable<Result>() {
                  public Result call() {
                    return ok(
                        list.render(
                            Computer.page(page, 10, sortBy, order, filter),
                            sortBy, order, filter
                        )
                    );
                  }
                }
        )
    );

}

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1  
Ok. Great. Thanks for the answer. Still confused why they aren't doing this in the documentation and the samples. Isn't the whole point that you can't/really shouldn't block the main request/event loop? –  Erik Tjernlund Dec 1 '12 at 10:16

Yes, the db driver blocks a thread waiting for the results from the database.

Even if you wrap the JDBC call in an Akka future like ico_ekito suggests, it will still block one server thread for the whole duration of the database request. Doing that potentially only executes the call on a different thread (depends on how Akka decides to execute it), but it will still block that thread.

The only proper way around this is to use a non-blocking database driver.

Btw, you can spot a blocking db driver quite easily. If its interface looks something like this:

ResultSet results = connection.execute(query);

It is definitely blocking. You can recognize a non-blocking API by methods returning Futures, Promises (which are Futures with a write side), or taking callbacks.

Also note that there is no "main" server thread (like the UI thread in browsers / desktop applications). There are just several threads handling requests.

For a deeper discussion have look a here.

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Hmm. I'm not sure I understand your answer. No "main server thread"? Isn't there? AFAIK all requests come in on the same thread in Play? (Like node.js et al) So if you do any blocking io, all clients will have to wait. –  Erik Tjernlund Dec 1 '12 at 10:12
1  
As @MartinKonicek pointed out, there is not an only one Thread for the incoming requests. It is managed by the Akka actors used by the core or Play. The default config is available here: github.com/playframework/Play20/blob/2.0.4/framework/src/play/… –  nico_ekito Dec 1 '12 at 13:08
    
Ok. This is the reason for my big initial misunderstanding. Then I understand why the ordinary JDBC access looks like it's blocking all clients, but it isn't. Big thanks to the both of you. –  Erik Tjernlund Dec 1 '12 at 13:35
    
I realize one of the things confusing me is stuff like this from the documentation: "Because of the way Play 2.0 works, action code must be as fast as possible (i.e. non blocking)." –  Erik Tjernlund Dec 1 '12 at 14:29

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