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Say I have this sample data

A =
1.0000     6.0000   180.0000    12.0000
1.0000     5.9200   190.0000    11.0000
1.0000     5.5800   170.0000    12.0000
1.0000     5.9200   165.0000    10.0000
2.0000     5.0000   100.0000     6.0000
2.0000     5.5000   150.0000     8.0000
2.0000     5.4200   130.0000     7.0000
2.0000     5.7500   150.0000     9.0000

I wish to calculate the variance of each column, grouped by class (the first column).

I have this working with the following code, but it uses hard coded indices, requiring knowledge of the number of samples per class and they must be in specific order.

Is there a better way to do this?

variances = zeros(2,4);
variances = [1.0 var(A(1:4,2)), var(A(1:4,3)), var(A(1:4,4));
             2.0 var(A(5:8,2)), var(A(5:8,3)), var(A(5:8,4))];

disp(variances);

1.0 3.5033e-02   1.2292e+02   9.1667e-01
2.0 9.7225e-02   5.5833e+02   1.6667e+00
share|improve this question
    
Also, if I could avoid storing the class number (1.0 2.0 etc) directly and just store the 3 results in the relevant row of variances that would be even better. –  Alasdair Nov 29 '12 at 1:51
    
Let's we find the class first and store that into the variable. Next we find var() for each column group by that class. Will that do for you? –  bonCodigo Nov 29 '12 at 1:52
    
I can guarantee that the class identifier starts at 1 and is continuous –  Alasdair Nov 29 '12 at 1:52
    
@bonCodigo hard to say till I see what you're suggesting :) I'm new to matlab –  Alasdair Nov 29 '12 at 1:54
    
@Iain is the class number 1, 2, 3, ... or can it be 1.3, 2, 4.5, ... Also is the number of rows for given class same (in your example you have 3 rows for each class 1 and 2). –  mythealias Nov 29 '12 at 1:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Separate the class labels and the data into different variables.

cls = A(:, 1);
data = A(:, 2:end);

Get the list of class labels

labels = unique(cls);

Compute the variances

variances = zeros(length(labels), 3);
for i = 1:length(labels)
  variances(i, :) = var(data(cls == labels(i), :)); % note the use of logical indexing
end
share|improve this answer
    
this is really great - I've not seen the use of a boolean expression in a matrix lookup like that before. many thanks. learning one question at a time.. –  Alasdair Nov 29 '12 at 2:04
    
@Dima ahh I see. I misunderstood the question. I have removed my comment. –  mythealias Nov 29 '12 at 2:10
    
@Iain For more information on logical indexing, see this: mathworks.com/help/matlab/math/… –  Dima Nov 29 '12 at 2:11
    
@dima ha, I'm reading something similar right now. thanks again –  Alasdair Nov 29 '12 at 2:13
    
@Iain, you are very welcome. :) –  Dima Nov 29 '12 at 2:16

I've done a fair bit of this type of stuff over the years, but to be able to judge, better vs. best, it would help to know what you expect to change in the data set or structure.

Otherwise, if no change is anticipated and the hard code works, stick with it.

share|improve this answer
    
I was really more interested in learning matlab than this specific case, but I know exctly what you mean about sticking with what works :) –  Alasdair Nov 29 '12 at 2:05
    
I like Dima's response for that purpose. That approach has worked for me before as well. –  Daniel Saban Nov 29 '12 at 2:08

Easy, peasy. Use consolidator. It is on the file exchange.

A = [1.0000     6.0000   180.0000    12.0000
1.0000     5.9200   190.0000    11.0000
1.0000     5.5800   170.0000    12.0000
1.0000     5.9200   165.0000    10.0000
2.0000     5.0000   100.0000     6.0000
2.0000     5.5000   150.0000     8.0000
2.0000     5.4200   130.0000     7.0000
2.0000     5.7500   150.0000     9.0000];

[C1,var234] = consolidator(A(:,1),A(:,2:4),@var)
C1 =
     1
     2
var234 =
     0.035033       122.92      0.91667
     0.097225       558.33       1.6667

We can test the variances produced, since we know the grouping.

var(A(1:4,2:4))
ans =
     0.035033       122.92      0.91667

var(A(5:8,2:4))
ans =
     0.097225       558.33       1.6667

It is efficient too.

share|improve this answer
    
looks good - thanks for the pointer –  Alasdair Nov 29 '12 at 5:36

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