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For example, how do you count the occurrence of "TJ" in OAEKOTJEOTJ?

if (s[i] == 'TJ') and (s[i] == 'T'+'J')
    x += 1;

First one gives me an error, second one doesn't count. I need a beginner solution to this, I haven't learned very much about c++ commands yet. Thanks

int x = 0
string s;
cin >> s;
for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
if (s[i] == T || s[i] == t) && (s[i+1] == J || s[i+1] == j)
x += 1
cout << x << endl;

That's the excerpt from my code, it doesn't count any tj, tJ, Tj or TJ

share|improve this question
    
Are you trying to find the substring "TJ" or are you actually talking about multi-character literals? –  Luchian Grigore Nov 29 '12 at 1:49
    
If it's actually the two characters, you can copy it into a std::string, loop each time you string::find it and string::erase it after you increase the counter. –  chris Nov 29 '12 at 1:52
    
Not sure what the difference is, I guess I'm trying to find the substring within the string. Like there are 2 TJs in that string I posted. –  Foxic Nov 29 '12 at 1:55
    
@Foxic, Multi-character literals aren't useful for much, if anything. Basically, you'd expect something like 'a', but 'ab' (a multi-character literal) is also a valid construct. –  chris Nov 29 '12 at 2:04
1  
The reason 'TJ' doesn't work is that it's a multi-character literal. The reason 'T'+'J' doesn't work is that adding two characters just gives a new character—in ASCII, the result is '?'. The third one is close, but you forgot the single quotes around the characters. –  abarnert Nov 29 '12 at 2:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try using:

if(s[i] == 'T' && s[i+1] == 'J') // and make sure you do not run out of bounds of string with index i.
x += 1;

EDIT: Based on your code:

int x = 0
string s;
cin >> s;
for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
if (s[i] == T || s[i] == t) && (s[i+1] == J || s[i+1] == j)
x += 1
cout << x << endl;

You should do it like following:

int x = 0
string s;
cin >> s;
for (int i = 0; i < s.length()-1; i++) // use size of string s.length()-1 to iterate the string instead of 100
     if (s[i] == 'T' || s[i] == 't') && (s[i+1] == 'J' || s[i+1] == 'j') // compare the ascii values of characters like - 'T' 'J' etc.
         x += 1
cout << x << endl;
share|improve this answer
    
This looks for individual characters, the questions is about multi-characters. –  Luchian Grigore Nov 29 '12 at 1:50
    
It doesn't work unfortunately –  Foxic Nov 29 '12 at 1:53
    
what error are you getting... there are other ways to do this, but it would be good to understand what specifically your problem is, many people that can answer your question are making assumptions about the rest of your code which may not be correct, given that you are a self-proclaimed novice and most whom answer will not be –  Daniel Saban Nov 29 '12 at 1:55
    
@Foxic : If you are using a string class, there are some functions you could use like s.find("TJ")etc. –  srbhkmr Nov 29 '12 at 2:01
1  
@Foxic, string::find returns the index it's found at. You can compare this value against std::string::npos, which means it wasn't found, in conjunction with increasing the index it was found at to begin the next search. –  chris Nov 29 '12 at 2:05

std::string provides a function find which searches the string for substrings, including multi-character substrings (below, I am using C++11 syntax):

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
  using namespace std;
  string text { "OAEKOTJEOTJ" };
  unsigned int occ { 0 };
  size_t       pos { 0 };
  for (;;) {
    pos = text.find("TJ",pos);      // Search for the substring, start at pos
    if (pos == string::npos)        // Quit if nothing found
      break;
    ++pos;                          // Continue from next position
    ++occ;                          // Count the occurrence
  }
  std::cout << "Found " << occ << " occurrences." << std::endl;
}

The way it's done above we advance by one character only after each match. Depending on whether/how we want to deal with overlapping matches, we might want to advance pos by the length of the search pattern. (See chris's comment as well.)

share|improve this answer
    
I haven't learned any of this yet unfortunately, is there some easier way? –  Foxic Nov 29 '12 at 2:01
1  
Wow, I completely forgot you can specify the starting position in find. –  chris Nov 29 '12 at 2:03
    
@Foxic If you don't / cannot use the find function, best go with srbh.kmr's approach. –  jogojapan Nov 29 '12 at 2:03
    
His gives a bigger value, if I have 4 occurrences, itll say 7 –  Foxic Nov 29 '12 at 2:05
    
@jogojapan, You might want to increase pos by 2, since you're finding two sequential characters. That one more comes down to if you're finding aa and you have aaa in the string - do you count it as one or two? –  chris Nov 29 '12 at 2:07

Try this:

#include <locale> // for tolower() function

string tolower(string s) {
  tolower(s[0]);
  tolower(s[1]);
  return s;
}
...
int main() {
  string s;
  cin >> s;
  int n = s.size(),cont = 0;
  for(int i = 0; i < n ; ++i) {
    if(tolower(s.substr(i,2)) == "tj") {
      ++cont;
    }
  }
  cout << cont << endl;
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
substr's second parameter is the number of characters. –  chris Nov 29 '12 at 2:16
    
Won't this go out of bounds? i < n-2. –  Alex Nov 29 '12 at 2:17
    
sorry, my mystake on the second parameter, and no s = "hello"; cout << s.substr(3,5); will output "lo" –  hinafu Nov 29 '12 at 2:20
    
For your tolower function, you might as well use the tolower that's already implemented for characters. –  chris Nov 29 '12 at 2:21
    
Yes, I know, but maybe he doesn't know that function. Of course, perhaps he doesn't know substr function either, but who knows. –  hinafu Nov 29 '12 at 2:26

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