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Why won't this delete items from my list of Road objects?

Relevant info

Road objects take (self, city1, city2, length), and City objects take (self, name, population);

I am saving these objects into a lists _cities and _roads so that I can modify them.

This definition is supposed to delete any roads attached to a city and then delete the city.

However, my code doesn't want to delete my roads (and I get no errors) so my logic must be flawed.

Can you help?

class Network:

    def __init__(self):

        self._cities = []  # list of City objects in this network
        self._roads = []   # list of Road objects in this network

    def hasCity(self, name):

        for x in self._cities:
            if x.name == name:
                return True
        return False

    def hasRoad(self, road):

        for x in self._roads:
            if x.city1 == road[0] and x.city2 == road[1]:
                return True
            elif x.city1 == road[1] and x.city2 == road[0]:
                return True
            else:
                return False

    def addCity(self, name, pop):
        if self.hasCity(name) == True:
            return False
        else:
            self._cities.append(City(name, pop))
            return True

    def addRoad(self, road, length):

        if self.hasRoad(road) == True:
            return False
        else:
            self._roads.append(Road(road[0], road[1], length))
            return True

    def delRoad(self, road):
        if self.hasRoad(road) == False:
            return False
        else:
            for x in self._roads:
                if x.city1 == road[0] and x.city2 == road[1]:
                    self._roads.remove(x)
                    return True
                elif x.city1 == road[1] and x.city2 == road[0]:
                    self._roads.remove(x)
                    return True
                else:
                    return False


    def delCity(self, city):

        if self.hasCity(city) == False:
            return False
        else:
            for x in self._cities:
                if x.name == city:
                    for j in self._roads:
                        if j.city1 == x.name:
                            self.delRoad((j.city1, j.city2))
                            self.delRoad((j.city2, j.city1))
                        elif j.city2 == x.name:
                            self.delRoad((j.city1, j.city2))
                            self.delRoad((j.city2, j.city1))
                    self._cities.remove(x)
                    return True
share|improve this question
1  
Can you maybe put in the whole class? – nair.ashvin Nov 29 '12 at 3:52
    
You could rephrase the question to say "how to delete edges of an undirected graph." – AsheeshR Nov 29 '12 at 3:52
    
The deeply nested if blocks seem redundant; they could be together in an if j.city1 == x.name or j.city2 == x.name: clause – Jesse the Game Nov 29 '12 at 3:54
    
Hey editor, who says there are no cycles in the graph? – Jesse the Game Nov 29 '12 at 3:58
    
What's in delRoad? – Nick ODell Nov 29 '12 at 4:05

The reason is probably that you delete an element of a list on which you iterate. This is generally a bad practice.

share|improve this answer
1  
While that generally is a bad practice, he says that the roads are deleted. The roads would be deleted before city removal is attempted. – Joshua D. Boyd Nov 29 '12 at 3:58
    
Vkontori, I checked it and I think @Joshua D. Boyd is right - I don't see where I would have done this (unless you do?!) – Tyler Seymour Nov 29 '12 at 4:14
    
Your bug is in hasRoad it will not check all roads, instead it will return false if the first one does not match. – vkontori Nov 29 '12 at 4:57
    
To fix it you should return False, outside the for loop. Then the whole thing should work... – vkontori Nov 29 '12 at 5:03
    
vkontori - genius! Thanks. What an eye! – Tyler Seymour Nov 29 '12 at 5:41

delCity is could be improved, but it seems to work fine. I believe you need to post more code. I worked up sample code to test delCity. Here is the City class:

class City(object):
    def __init__(self, name, population):
        self.name = name
        self.population = population

    def __repr__(self):
        return "City(%r, %r)" % (self.name, self.population)

Here is the Road class:

class Road(object):
    def __init__ (self, city1, city2, length):
        self.city1 = city1
        self.city2 = city2
        self.length = length

    def __repr__(self):
        return "Road(%r, %r, %r)" % (self.city1, self.city2, self.length)

Here is the Test class that I pasted you delCity method into:

class Test(object):
    def __init__(self, cities, roads):
        self._cities = cities
        self._roads = roads

    def hasCity(self, city_name):
        for c in self._cities:
            if c.name == city_name:
                return True
        return False

    def delRoad(self, pair):
        for x in self._roads:
            if x.city1 == pair[0] and x.city2 == pair[1]:
                self._roads.remove(x)

    def delCity(self, city):
        if self.hasCity(city) == False: #checks to see if city isn't in list
            return False
        else:
            for x in self._cities:
                if x.name == city:
                    for j in self._roads:
                        if j.city1 == x.name:
                            self.delRoad((j.city1, j.city2)) ##delRoad takes a tuple
                            self.delRoad((j.city2, j.city1))
                        elif j.city2 == x.name:
                            self.delRoad((j.city1, j.city2))
                            self.delRoad((j.city2, j.city1))
                    self._cities.remove(x)
                    return True

And here I now test your code:

>>> t = Test([City('x', 1), City('y', 1), City('z', 1)],
             [Road('x', 'y', 1), Road('y', 'z', 1)])
>>> t.delCity('x')

>>> print t._cities
[City('y', 1), City('z', 1)]
>>> print t._roads
[Road('y', 'z', 1)]

As you can see, the city and single road that went to that city was deleted.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, I'll keep debugging. Thanks for checking that for me. I'll post back when I start banging my head against the wall again. – Tyler Seymour Nov 29 '12 at 4:16

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