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Zlib::GzipReader can take "an IO, or -IO-lie, object." as it's input, as stated in docs.

Zlib::GzipReader.open('hoge.gz') {|gz|
    print gz.read
  }

  File.open('hoge.gz') do |f|
    gz = Zlib::GzipReader.new(f)
    print gz.read
    gz.close
  end

How should I ungzip a string?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You need Zlib::Inflate for decompression of a string and Zlib::Deflate for compression

  def inflate(string)
    zstream = Zlib::Inflate.new
    buf = zstream.inflate(string)
    zstream.finish
    zstream.close
    buf
  end
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The above method didn't work for me.
I kept getting incorrect header check (Zlib::DataError) error.
I tried decompressing a http response body to access xml.
The work around that I implemented was:

gz = Zlib::GzipReader.new(StringIO.new(resp.body.to_s))    
xml = gz.read
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2  
Thank you, I was getting the same error and this solved my problem! –  Matt Huggins Mar 24 '13 at 1:07
    
Mucho help here too –  simonmorley Jan 17 at 10:27
    
is calling body.to_s redundant? –  Blaskovicz Jun 26 at 17:50

Zlib by default asumes that your compressed data contains a header. If your data does NOT contain a header it will fail by raising a Zlib::DataError.

You can tell Zlib to assume the data has no header via the following workaround:

def inflate(string)
  zstream = Zlib::Inflate.new(-Zlib::MAX_WBITS)
  buf = zstream.inflate(string)
  zstream.finish
  zstream.close
  buf
end
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Using (-Zlib::MAX_WBITS), I got ERROR: invalid code lengths set and ERROR: invalid block type
The only following works for me, too.

Zlib::GzipReader.new(StringIO.new(response_body)).read
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We don't need any extra parameters these days. There are deflate and inflate class methods which allow for quick oneliners like these:

>> data = "Hello, Zlib!"
>> compressed = Zlib::Deflate.deflate(data)
=> "x\234\363H\315\311\311\327Q\210\312\311LR\004\000\032\305\003\363"
>> uncompressed = Zlib::Inflate.inflate(compressed)
=> "Hello, Zlib!"

I think it answers the question "How should I ungzip a string?" the best. :)

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3  
If you compress and decompress then this will be fine, but it will not be gzip compressed. Just running Zlib::Inflate.inflate(compressed) on gzip compressed data will assume the wrong compression and throw a "incorrect header check" exception. –  philwhln Nov 4 '12 at 22:20

I used the answer above to use a Zlib::Deflate

I kept getting broken files (for small files) and it took many hours to figure out that the problem can be fixed using:

buf = zstream.deflate(string,Zlib::FINISH)

without the the zstream.finish line!

def self.deflate(string)
    zstream = Zlib::Deflate.new
    buf = zstream.deflate(string,Zlib::FINISH)
    zstream.close
    buf
end
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To gunzip content, use following code (tested on 1.9.2)

Zlib::GzipReader.new(StringIO.new(content), :external_encoding => content.encoding).read

Beware of encoding problems

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zstream = Zlib::Inflate.new(16+Zlib::MAX_WBITS)

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Nice one. From the docs "or add 16 to decode only the gzip format (a Zlib::DataError will be raised for a non-gzip stream)" –  iain Dec 10 at 13:39

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