Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an array with boolean values:

var array = [false, false, false];

I want to execute a function only if all the elements are false.

I tried this and it didn't work, because it would execute the function for every false:

for(var i = 0; i < array.length; i++){
   if(array[i] === false){
      functionA();   //This function ran at every false
   }else{
      //Do something else
   }
}
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted
if (array.indexOf(true) == -1) {
    functionA();
}

The indexOf function returns the first index at which a given element can be found in the array, or -1 if it is not present.

share|improve this answer
    
This is not same. The code in question call functionA() each times for false. But your answer is not. –  mattn Nov 29 '12 at 4:44
1  
@BenjaminCox: null is not a boolean. –  leppie Nov 29 '12 at 4:49
1  
@BenjaminCox: It could also contain 15. But the OP said "boolean values". –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Nov 29 '12 at 4:56
1  
Not a problem. Happy coding. –  Steve Nov 29 '12 at 4:57
1  
@minitech he also said in the title "execute function only when all array elements are identical" but then changed it up in the description to "only if all elements are false". Just trying to be thorough in case his language was imprecise. –  Benjamin Cox Nov 29 '12 at 5:00

You could do something like:

function checkAllSameValue(array) {
  var identical = true;
  var i = 0;

  while ((i + 1) in array && identical) {
    identical = array[i] == array[++i];
  }

  return identical;
}

Which checks if each member is identical to the next

Edit

In response to ilia choly's issues with performance and lookups, here's an alternative that is as fast as a for loop, perhaps faster depending on the UA:

function checkAllSameValue(array) {
  var i = array.length;
  var value = array[--i];

  while (i) {
    if (arr[--i] != value) return false
  }
  return true;
}

Whether == or === should be used is up to the OP. None of the posted solutions deals with sparse arrays, so none are general solutions.

share|improve this answer
    
There's a lot wrong with this. –  ilia choly Nov 29 '12 at 4:52
1  
Identical would be ===, but it seems like that might not be entirely what was asked. (But yeah... checkAllSameValue(0, false, '', []) :P) –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Nov 29 '12 at 4:55
    
you're looking up each value 3 times. –  ilia choly Nov 29 '12 at 5:12
1  
@minitech—good point, the OP can change the comparison if required. @iliacholy—performance is unlikely to be an issue unless there are 10,000 or so elements, which seems unlikely. Can you explain why "there's a lot wrong with this"? –  RobG Nov 29 '12 at 13:47
1  
@iliacholy—I've posted a faster version just to keep you happy. The first only looks up values twice, it looks up properties 3 times. –  RobG Dec 3 '12 at 23:17

Gues this will help:

var array = [false, false, false];
var flag = true;
for(var i = 0; i < array.length; i++){
   if(array[i]!= false){
    flag = false;
    break;
   }
}
if(flag){
  functionA();   //This function call function only once
}
share|improve this answer

The way you describe it is slightly different from the title. If you're only trying to execute the function if they are all false, then Steve's answer is great. Depending on where this array comes from, I would probably expand it like so, though, to be defensive about it:

if (array.indexOf(true) == -1 && array.indexOf(null) == -1) {
    functionA();
}

OTOH, if you want to run it any time they are all the same, then you'll need more complex logic.

In that case, I would probably set a flag, update it in the loop, and then do the function call after the loop. You'll also need a variable to keep track of the previous value. If any value doesn't match its previous value, they're not all the same, so you set the flag to false. Then, after the loop, you check the flag and run the function if it's true.

Something like this:

var runFunction = true;
var previousVal = -1;
for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++){
   if(previousVal === -1) {
      previousVal = array[i];
   }
   if(array[i] !== previousVal){
      runFunction = false;
      break;
   }
}
if (runFunction) {
   functionA();
} else {
   // Do something else
}
share|improve this answer
    
you don't need to keep updating the previous value. They're all supposed to be the same right? –  ilia choly Nov 29 '12 at 5:05
    
@ilia-choly good point... also could break out of the loop once you get it. I'll update my answer accordingly. –  Benjamin Cox Nov 29 '12 at 5:14
    
also, you can set previousVal to the first element in the array right off the bat. Then start iterating at index 1 (var i = 1). So even if the array is empty and previousVal is undefined, it will never enter to loop body. That saves you from checking for -1 in every iteration, and you're not comparing the first one with itself. –  ilia choly Nov 29 '12 at 5:18

Steve's way is better, but if you were going to use your approach it would be

var allFalse = true, i;

for(i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
    if(array[i]){
        allFalse = false;
        break;
    }
}

if (allFalse) {
    functionA();
}

or

if (array.every(function(val) { return !val; })) {
    functionA();
}

if you want a generic function to check if all elements are the same you can do this

function checkAllSameValue(array) {
    var first = array[0], i;

    for (i = 1; i < array.length; i++) {
        if (array[i] !== first) return false;
    }

    return true;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.