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I want to fetch values from database with specific intervals in C# and need a single query for that. This is how my Database looks like

Id   SensorId    Value        CreatedOn   
------------------------------------------------      
1       8        33.5      15-11-2012  5:48 PM        
2       5        49.2      15-11-2012  5:48 PM
3       8        33.2      15-11-2012  5:49 PM  
4       5        48.5      15-11-2012  5:49 PM  
5       8        31.8      15-11-2012  5:50 PM 
6       5        42.5      15-11-2012  5:50 PM 
7       8        36.5      15-11-2012  5:51 PM 
8       5        46.5      15-11-2012  5:51 PM 
9       8        39.2      15-11-2012  5:52 PM 
10      5        44.4      15-11-2012  5:52 PM 
11      8        36.5      15-11-2012  5:53 PM 
12      5        46.5      15-11-2012  5:53 PM 
13      8        39.2      15-11-2012  5:54 PM 
14      5        44.4      15-11-2012  5:54 PM 
..      ..       .....     ...................

The interval is in minutes. So, if the interval is 10 minutes, then we need the values at 5:48, 5:58, 6:08 and so on...

I tried doing it with a while loop but it is taking a lot of time as i shoot multiple queries to the database.

Is there any way of getting the data in a single query?

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4 Answers 4

You can use datepart along with a modulus to get the matching rows (eg, @interval = 10, @offset = 8):

SELECT * FROM table
WHERE datepart(minute, CreatedOn) % @interval = @offset

Edit

Note that the above isn't a general solution of selecting by intervals. It will work across hours (and therefore across days) for intervals like 2, 3, 4, 5 ... any minute interval which divides into 60.

If you want to use a strange interval like 7 minutes, then you'd have to define a starting time for the interval and calculate the total minutes for each row, inclusive of hours/days. At that point you'd be best to create an indexed, computed column on the table, based on a user-defined function that calculates the interval in question.

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2  
Please don't forget that if this query is important and the table is large, an index on this expression should be created to avoid a sequential scan. –  Marcelo Zabani Nov 29 '12 at 5:39
    
@MarceloZabani yes, good point ... might even be worthwhile to add a computed column and index against it –  McGarnagle Nov 29 '12 at 5:41
    
It should be noted, however, that to make use of an index, either interval should be constant and the mod operation be indexed, or the query would have to be changed to contain 6 equality comparisons: datepart(minute, CreatedOn) = 08 OR datepart(minute, CreatedOn) = 18 OR datepart(minute, CreatedOn) = 28 .. and so on with an index on datepart(minute, CreatedOn) alone. This could generate a bit of index activity, but it is still better than a sequential scan. –  Marcelo Zabani Nov 29 '12 at 5:42
    
But i want values for 3 days with 2 minutes interval. So in that case this thing will not work. –  Mayur Dhingra Nov 29 '12 at 6:01
    
@MayurDhingra well actually, for the interval 2 minutes, that would still work, because the mod value will pick the correct values across multiple days. But I take your general point -- it wouldn't work even across hours if the interval were, say, 7 minutes. –  McGarnagle Nov 29 '12 at 6:09

Here is how you can do it, explanation is contained within comments in code:

/*We want 10-minute intervals starting 
  from minimum date to next day same time*/
DECLARE @startDateTime DATETIME = (
    SELECT  MIN(CreatedOn)
    FROM    #yourTable
)
DECLARE @endDateTime DATETIME = DATEADD(DAY, 1, @startDateTime)

DECLARE @startDateTimeTable TABLE (dt DATETIME)
INSERT @startDateTimeTable VALUES (@startDateTime)

/*Create a table that contains relevant datetimes (10-minute 
  intervals from starting date to end date)*/
;WITH a AS (
    SELECT  dt
    FROM    @startDateTimeTable
    UNION   ALL
    SELECT  DATEADD(MINUTE, 10, a.dt)
    FROM    a
    JOIN    @startDateTimeTable b ON a.dt <= @endDateTime
)
SELECT  *
INTO    #requiredDateTimes
FROM    a
OPTION  (MAXRECURSION 32767)

/*Now join data table to datetime table to 
  filter out only records with datetimes that we want*/
SELECT  *
FROM    #yourTable a
JOIN    #requiredDateTimes b ON
        a.CreatedOn = b.dt

Here is an SQL Fiddle

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This is the right approach. The other samples that rely on modulus imply that there will always be a value at that specific time. One must first project the each interval date, then find the closest match - probably the last value on or before that date. HOWEVER, the OP did ask for a LINQ solution. Something as complex as this answer would beg for a stored proc. There is probably a way to express this concept in a single LINQ query. –  Matt Johnson Nov 29 '12 at 17:33
    
@MattJohnson Thanks Matt, I agree, I haven't read that part about C#. OP actually posted another question similar to this, but emphasized that he needs LINQ answer, so I trans-coded this idea to LINQ and posted it as answer to his other question. –  Ivan G Nov 29 '12 at 17:47

Any of the answers that recommend using modulus (%) are making several assumptions:

  1. You will always have a reading on every sensor at the exact minute in question
  2. You will never have more than one reading in a minute per sensor.
  3. You will never have to deal with intervals smaller than a minute.

These are probably false assumptions, so you need a different approach. First, make a map of all of the time points you are querying over. Then take the last reading from each sensor on or before that point.

Here's a full unit test showing how it can be done in pure linq-to-objects. You may need some minor changes to the query to get it to work in linq-to-sql, but this is the right approach. I used the exact sample data you provided.

As an aside - I hope you are recording your CreatedOn dates in UTC, or you will have ambiguity of sensor readings during daylight savings time "fall-back" transitions. You need to record as DateTime in UTC, or using DateTimeOffset. Either are an appropriate representation of instantaneous time. A DateTime with .Kind of Local or Unspecified is only a valid representation of calendar time, which is not appropriate for sensor readings.

[TestClass]
public class LinqIntervalQueryTest
{
    public class Item
    {
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public int SensorId { get; set; }
        public double Value { get; set; }
        public DateTime CreatedOn { get; set; }
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Test()
    {
        var data = new[]
            {
                new Item { Id = 1, SensorId = 8, Value = 33.5, CreatedOn = new DateTime(2012, 11, 15, 17, 48, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc) },
                new Item { Id = 2, SensorId = 5, Value = 49.2, CreatedOn = new DateTime(2012, 11, 15, 17, 48, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc) },
                new Item { Id = 3, SensorId = 8, Value = 33.2, CreatedOn = new DateTime(2012, 11, 15, 17, 49, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc) },
                new Item { Id = 4, SensorId = 5, Value = 48.5, CreatedOn = new DateTime(2012, 11, 15, 17, 49, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc) },
                new Item { Id = 5, SensorId = 8, Value = 31.8, CreatedOn = new DateTime(2012, 11, 15, 17, 50, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc) },
                new Item { Id = 6, SensorId = 5, Value = 42.5, CreatedOn = new DateTime(2012, 11, 15, 17, 50, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc) },
                new Item { Id = 7, SensorId = 8, Value = 36.5, CreatedOn = new DateTime(2012, 11, 15, 17, 51, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc) },
                new Item { Id = 8, SensorId = 5, Value = 46.5, CreatedOn = new DateTime(2012, 11, 15, 17, 51, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc) },
                new Item { Id = 9, SensorId = 8, Value = 39.2, CreatedOn = new DateTime(2012, 11, 15, 17, 52, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc) },
                new Item { Id = 10, SensorId = 5, Value = 44.4, CreatedOn = new DateTime(2012, 11, 15, 17, 52, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc) },
                new Item { Id = 11, SensorId = 8, Value = 36.5, CreatedOn = new DateTime(2012, 11, 15, 17, 53, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc) },
                new Item { Id = 12, SensorId = 5, Value = 46.5, CreatedOn = new DateTime(2012, 11, 15, 17, 53, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc) },
                new Item { Id = 13, SensorId = 8, Value = 39.2, CreatedOn = new DateTime(2012, 11, 15, 17, 54, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc) },
                new Item { Id = 14, SensorId = 5, Value = 44.4, CreatedOn = new DateTime(2012, 11, 15, 17, 54, 0, DateTimeKind.Utc) },
            };

        var interval = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(3);
        var startDate = data.First().CreatedOn;
        var endDate = data.Last().CreatedOn;

        var numberOfPoints = (int)((endDate - startDate + interval).Ticks / interval.Ticks);
        var points = Enumerable.Range(0, numberOfPoints).Select(x => startDate.AddTicks(interval.Ticks * x));

        var query = from item in data
                    group item by item.SensorId
                    into g
                    from point in points
                    let itemToUse = g.LastOrDefault(x => x.CreatedOn <= point)
                    orderby itemToUse.CreatedOn, g.Key
                    select new
                        {
                            itemToUse.CreatedOn,
                            itemToUse.Value,
                            SensorId = g.Key
                        };

        var results = query.ToList();

        Assert.AreEqual(6, results.Count);

        Assert.AreEqual(data[1].CreatedOn, results[0].CreatedOn);
        Assert.AreEqual(data[1].Value, results[0].Value);
        Assert.AreEqual(data[1].SensorId, results[0].SensorId);

        Assert.AreEqual(data[0].CreatedOn, results[1].CreatedOn);
        Assert.AreEqual(data[0].Value, results[1].Value);
        Assert.AreEqual(data[0].SensorId, results[1].SensorId);

        Assert.AreEqual(data[7].CreatedOn, results[2].CreatedOn);
        Assert.AreEqual(data[7].Value, results[2].Value);
        Assert.AreEqual(data[7].SensorId, results[2].SensorId);

        Assert.AreEqual(data[6].CreatedOn, results[3].CreatedOn);
        Assert.AreEqual(data[6].Value, results[3].Value);
        Assert.AreEqual(data[6].SensorId, results[3].SensorId);

        Assert.AreEqual(data[13].CreatedOn, results[4].CreatedOn);
        Assert.AreEqual(data[13].Value, results[4].Value);
        Assert.AreEqual(data[13].SensorId, results[4].SensorId);

        Assert.AreEqual(data[12].CreatedOn, results[5].CreatedOn);
        Assert.AreEqual(data[12].Value, results[5].Value);
        Assert.AreEqual(data[12].SensorId, results[5].SensorId);
    }
}
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Here's how you can do it in two calls to the database (untested):

int interval = 10;
DateTime firstDate = db.Items.Select(x => x.CreatedOn).Min();
var items = db.Items.Where(x => (x.CreatedOn - firstDate).TotalMinutes % interval == 0).ToList();
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