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-(void)viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated
{
   [super viewWillAppear:animated];
   UIImageView *imageView = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(100, 100, 100, 100)];
   imageView.image = [UIImage imageNamed:@"Sample.png"];
   [self.view addSubview:imageView];
   NSArray *subviews = [self.view subviews];
   for(id element in subviews) {
      if ([[element class] isKindOfClass:[UIImageView class]]) //check if the object is a UIImageView
      {
         NSLog(@"element is a UIImageView\n");
         [element setCenter:CGPointMake(500., 500.)];
      } else {
         NSLog(@"element is NOT a UIImageView\n");
      }
   }
}

I expected the output to be "element is a UIImageView, but it's actually element is NOT a UIImageView. Why? It's not that there are other subviews. There is only one. Furthermore, when run, the image is displayed at 100,100, not 500,500 as expected.

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I tried simply changing the code to use UIImageView instead of id, and the results were the same. –  Victor Engel Nov 29 '12 at 5:47
1  
id can be used as reference. What you are missing is you are calling isKindOfClass method in wrong way. Check my answer. –  Rahul Nov 29 '12 at 5:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Your check is wrong. You should call isKindOfClass: on object and not on class of object.

[element isKindOfClass:[UIImageView class]]
share|improve this answer
    
+1. That is the issue here. –  iDev Nov 29 '12 at 5:51
    
Thank you! Now you mention it, it is obvious! I was inspecting it in the debugger, and the debugger was showing UIImageView, which was really frustrating me. I was just looking at the wrong part of the code to debug. Thanks again. –  Victor Engel Nov 29 '12 at 5:54

Try the Following code.

-(void)viewWillAppear:(BOOL)animated
{
   [super viewWillAppear:animated];
   UIImageView *imageView = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(100, 100, 100, 100)];
   imageView.image = [UIImage imageNamed:@"Sample.png"];
   [self.view addSubview:imageView];
   NSArray *subviews = [self.view subviews];
   for(UIView *view in subviews) {
      if ([view isKindOfClass:[UIImageView class]]) //check if the object is a UIImageView
      {
         NSLog(@"element is a UIImageView\n");
         [element setCenter:CGPointMake(500., 500.)];
      } else {
         NSLog(@"element is NOT a UIImageView\n");
      }
   }
}

You can also Check sub views by tag value:

initially set imageView.tag=101;  //anything you want

for(UIView *subview in [view subviews]) {
    if(subview.tag== 101)/*your subview tag value here*/
     {

 NSLog(@"element is a UIImageView\n");
    } else {
       NSLog(@"element is NOT a UIImageView\n");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So it's because I didn't cast it? –  Victor Engel Nov 29 '12 at 5:39
    
Never mind. That is not working. The tag idea probably won't work for my project, unless I use the same tag for all images. There will be an unknown number of images with an unknown lifespan. –  Victor Engel Nov 29 '12 at 5:46
    
i Just edited my Answer if ([view isKindOfClass:[UIImageView class]]) Check Now. –  Siba Prasad Hota Nov 29 '12 at 5:48
    
It should be if ([view isKindOfClass:[UIImageView class]]) Your code wont compile. –  iDev Nov 29 '12 at 5:48
    
So in answer to my own question about casting, no. That's good, because the whole point of using isKindOfClass is that you possibly don't know the class. –  Victor Engel Nov 29 '12 at 6:00

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