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I am working on a Javascript function which takes an XML document and creates a multidimensional (as needed) associative array. Inside the function, the array builds properly however upon returning the Array object, it returns an empty array.

Interesting to note, if I use the push method, and push a literal Array in the form {"index": index, "value":value} rather than usign the assignment operator (array[index]=value) it works just fine

For testing I am using the following XML node object (Level_1_node):

<Level_1>
    <Level_2>VALUE</Level_2>
</Level_1>

Here is the function:

function get_array_from_XML(XML_node){
    var XML_array = new Array();
    var child_node;

    for(var i=0; i<XML_node.childNodes.length; i++){
        child_node = XML_node.childNodes[i];
        if(child_node.childNodes[0]){
            if (child_node.childNodes[0].nodeType == 3){
                XML_array[child_node.nodeName] = child_node.childNodes[0].nodeValue;
            } else {                
                XML_array[child_node.nodeName] = get_array_from_XML(child_node);
            }
        }
    }

    dump(XML_array);  //for my debugging, alerts "LEVEL_2 => VALUE", so everything seems fine

    return XML_array;
}

This method "works," however the return format is undesirable:

function get_array_from_XML_using_push(XML_node){
    var XML_array = new Array();
    var child_node;

    for(var i=0; i<XML_node.childNodes.length; i++){
        child_node = XML_node.childNodes[i];
        if(child_node.childNodes[0]){
            if (child_node.childNodes[0].nodeType == 3){
                XML_array.push({
                    "index" : child_node.nodeName,
                    "value" : child_node.childNodes[0].nodeValue
                });
            } else {                
                XML_array.push({
                    "index" : child_node.nodeName,
                    "value" : get_array_from_XML_using_push(child_node)
                });
            }
        }
    }

    dump(XML_array);  //shows the fully populated array

    return XML_array;
}

Now when I run get_array_from_XML(Level_1_node) it returns an empty array, but get_array_from_XML_using_push(Level_1_node) returns

{0 => {"index" => "Level_2", "value" => "VALUE"}}

Very frustrating. Any insight is welcome.

share|improve this question
2  
Do you realize that javascript doesn't have associative arrays? They have arrays and they have objects. If you want a numeric index, use an array. If you want a named index, use an object and let each named index be a property. –  jfriend00 Nov 29 '12 at 6:03
    
One should not use non-numeric "keys" in an array ([]) - apart from string version of integers, which is handled appropriately. That is for objects ({}). –  npup Nov 29 '12 at 6:05
    
Although I have heard "Javascript does not use associative arrays," I never had someone go in depth on the nuances. This clears things up. Thank you. –  Darren Nov 29 '12 at 6:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Change new Array() to new Object(). The Array constructor is not for associative arrays; it's for numerically indexed arrays only. Objects themselves double as associative arrays in JavaScript.

function get_array_from_XML(XML_node){
    var XML_array = new Object();
    // -------------------^
    var child_node;

    for(var i=0; i<XML_node.childNodes.length; i++){
        child_node = XML_node.childNodes[i];
        if(child_node.childNodes[0]){
            if (child_node.childNodes[0].nodeType == 3){
                XML_array[child_node.nodeName] = child_node.childNodes[0].nodeValue;
            } else {                
                XML_array[child_node.nodeName] = get_array_from_XML(child_node);
            }
        }
    }

    dump(XML_array);  //for my debugging, alerts "LEVEL_2 => VALUE", so everything seems fine

    return XML_array;
}

Using Objects as Associative Arrays

Have a look at the following example:

var colors = new Object();
colors['red'] = '#f00';
colors['green'] = '#0f0';
colors['blue'] = '#00f';
colors['black'] = '#000';
colors['white'] = '#fff';

conosle.log(colors['red']); // => #f00
conosle.log(colors['green']); // => #0f0
conosle.log(colors['white']); // => #fff

// Use for..in or Object.keys to iterate over an object
for (var key in colors) {
    console.log(key, colors[key]);
}
// Logs all colors and their corresponding code

Object.keys(colors).forEach(function(key) {
    console.log(key, colors[key]);
});
// Also logs all colors and their corresponding code

Note that colors['red'] = '#f00'; is identical to colors.red = '#f00';. The square bracket notation is only really needed when you want to use a string which is an invalid identifier or when you want to use the value of a variable as a property name.

share|improve this answer
    
Array constructor is for numerically indexed arrays only - after some years of using JS, I first stumbled over this issue today. Cannot believe it hasn't crossed my way earlier. Thanks for this valuable information! –  Echt Einfach TV Sep 3 at 18:47

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