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I have a simple code that I am trying to compile with lm32-rtems4.11-gcc.
I have the code, the compile command and the lst below. When I compile I see a bunch of code added on the top instead of the startup code that I want in there. The code I want the processor to start with after reset is at location 3f4 instead of 0. What I wanted help on is to figure out how the rest of the code got in and find a way to remove it or move all that code to addresses after my code. I appreciate the help.
Thanks

The code:

 //FILE: crt.S

.globl _start

.text
_start:
 xor r0, r0, r0
 mvhi sp, hi(_fstack)
 ori sp, sp, lo(_fstack)
 mv fp,r0
 mvhi r1, hi(_fbss)
 ori r1, r1, lo(_fbss)
 mvhi r2, hi(_ebss)
 ori r2, r2, lo(_ebss)
 1:
 bge r1, r2, 2f
 sw (r1+0), r0
 addi r1, r1, 4
 bi 1b
 2:
 calli main
 mvhi r1, 0xdead
 ori r2, r0, 0xbeef
 sw (r1+0), r2

 //FILE: hello_world.c

 void putc(char c)
 {
    char *tx = (char*)0xff000000;
    *tx = c;
 }

 void puts(char *s)
 {
    while (*s) putc(*s++);
 }

 void main(void)
 {
    puts("Hello World\n");
 }

 //FILE: linker.ld

OUTPUT_FORMAT("elf32-lm32")
ENTRY(_start)

__DYNAMIC = 0;

MEMORY {
    pmem : ORIGIN = 0x00000000, LENGTH = 0x8000
    dmem : ORIGIN = 0x00008000, LENGTH = 0x8000
}

SECTIONS
{
    .text :
    {
            _ftext = .;
            *(.text .stub .text.* .gnu.linkonce.t.*)
            _etext = .;
    } > pmem

    .rodata :
    {
            . = ALIGN(4);
            _frodata = .;
             *(.rodata .rodata.* .gnu.linkonce.r.*)
            *(.rodata1)
            _erodata = .;
    } > dmem

    .data :
    {
            . = ALIGN(4);
            _fdata = .;
            *(.data .data.* .gnu.linkonce.d.*)
            *(.data1)
            _gp = ALIGN(16);
            *(.sdata .sdata.* .gnu.linkonce.s.*)
            _edata = .;
    } > dmem

    .bss :
    {
            . = ALIGN(4);
            _fbss = .;
            *(.dynsbss)
            *(.sbss .sbss.* .gnu.linkonce.sb.*)
            *(.scommon)
            *(.dynbss)
            *(.bss .bss.* .gnu.linkonce.b.*)
            *(COMMON)
            . = ALIGN(4);
            _ebss = .;
            _end = .;
    } > dmem
}

The compile command

lm32-rtems4.11-gcc -Tlinker.ld -fno-builtin -o hello_world.elf crt.S hello_world.c
lm32-rtems4.11-objdump -DS hello_world.lst hello_world.elf

The lst file

00000000 <rtems_provides_crt0>:
#include <signal.h> /* sigset_t */
#include <time.h> /* struct timespec */
#include <unistd.h> /* isatty */

void rtems_provides_crt0( void ) {}  /* dummy symbol so file always has one */
0:   c3 a0 00 00     ret

00000004 <rtems_stub_malloc>:
#define RTEMS_STUB(ret, func, body) \
ret rtems_stub_##func body; \
ret func body

/* RTEMS provides some of its own routines including a Malloc family */
RTEMS_STUB(void *,malloc(size_t s), { return 0; })
4:   34 01 00 00     mvi r1,0
8:   c3 a0 00 00     ret

0000000c <malloc>:
c:   34 01 00 00     mvi r1,0
10:   c3 a0 00 00     ret
.
.
.
//omitting other such unrelated code that was inserted into the code and going to the 
//code at 3f4 that is the code I wanted at 0

000003f0 <__assert_func>:
3f0:   c3 a0 00 00     ret

000003f4 <_start>:
3f4:   98 00 00 00     xor r0,r0,r0
3f8:   78 1c 00 00     mvhi sp,0x0
3fc:   3b 9c ff fc     ori sp,sp,0xfffc
400:   b8 00 d8 00     mv fp,r0
404:   78 01 00 00     mvhi r1,0x0
408:   38 21 84 48     ori r1,r1,0x8448
40c:   78 02 00 00     mvhi r2,0x0
410:   38 42 84 48     ori r2,r2,0x8448
414:   4c 22 00 04     bge r1,r2,424 <_start+0x30>
418:   58 20 00 00     sw (r1+0),r0
41c:   34 21 00 04     addi r1,r1,4
420:   e3 ff ff fd     bi 414 <_start+0x20>
424:   f8 00 00 28     calli 4c4 <main>
428:   78 01 de ad     mvhi r1,0xdead
42c:   38 02 be ef     mvu r2,0xbeef
430:   58 22 00 00     sw (r1+0),r2
.
.
.
share|improve this question
    
It would appear that the code that got added at the start of the program is the standard C requirements regarding initialization of objects with static storage duration. That is: all statics/globals must be initialized before main() is called. Your code is using far too many standard library functions to live without this. If you didn't use so many libraries, there would perhaps be a non-standard work-around: embedded compilers typically have an option to exclude the static init code. –  Lundin Nov 29 '12 at 7:43
    
I don't understand much of this particular assembler, but it may also be setting the stack pointer(?), which is extremely fundamental and necessary to do before the stack is used. –  Lundin Nov 29 '12 at 7:44
    
If you observe the first line in the code you will see that it is a ret. So as soon as the processor comes out of reset the first command it executes is ret. Now I dont know what return address register is initialized but I guess either it will be 0 which would cause an infinite loop or some random value. The code is definitely acting funny on execution, this is what I could come up with being the possible error. If you observe the start code at address 3f4 it seems that sp is being initialized. I think the location of start should move from 3f4 to 0. –  vinay samuel Nov 29 '12 at 14:11
    
What processor is this code built for? –  Lundin Nov 29 '12 at 14:14
    
lattice Mico 32 –  vinay samuel Nov 29 '12 at 14:35
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2 Answers

As far as the .elf object you have generated is concerned, execution starts from 0x3f4, not from location 0. That's a result of your linker map specifying the entry point as the _start symbol. Whatever parses the .elf object should jump to that location when transferring execution to the program.

Now, perhaps an .elf object is not what you want to end up with - if the result isn't to be loaded by something which knows how to parse an .elf object, then you may need some other format, such as a flat binary image.

It's quite common when using a gcc elf toolchain with a small embedded chip to turn the .elf object into a flat binary using a command along the lines of

toolchain-prefix-objcopy -O binary something.elf something.bin

It's also possible you may need to create some sort of stub to jump to the _start label, and adjust your linker map to make sure that is the first thing in the image.

More generally though, you can probably find a working example for this toolchain and either this processor or a comparable one. Setting up embedded build systems from scratch is a bit tricky, so don't do it the hard way if there's any chance of finding an example to follow.

share|improve this answer
    
I did use objcopy to create the bin file. I then used a bin2hex utility to convert it to text hex and then loaded the code memory of the processor with this hex file. The problem was the memory layout of the bin was the same as the lst file i.e. the start point was not what was labeled as _start but the ret instruction as shown above(I figured this out by reading the Hex file and comparing it to the code words shown in the lst file). I eventually did a work around as shown below. –  vinay samuel Dec 5 '12 at 9:52
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

So I could not figure out why the compiler does not move the .start label to 0 when the linker.ld clearly tells it to do so. But I did figure a work around.

I created a section name for the startup code as shown in BOLD below. I then created a section in memory starting at 0 which I reserved only for this start up code. That seemed to do the trick. I ran the code and got a hello world :) . All the changes I made are in BOLD and also commented //Change 1 //Change 2 and //Change 3.

//FILE: crt.S

.section .init// Change 1

.globl _start

.text
_start:
xor r0, r0, r0
mvhi sp, hi(_fstack)
ori sp, sp, lo(_fstack)
mv fp,r0
mvhi r1, hi(_fbss)
ori r1, r1, lo(_fbss)
.
.

//linker.ld
OUTPUT_FORMAT("elf32-lm32")
ENTRY(_start)

__DYNAMIC = 0;

MEMORY {

init : ORIGIN = 0x00000000, LENGTH = 0x40 //Change 2

    pmem : ORIGIN = 0x00000040, LENGTH = 0x8000
    dmem : ORIGIN = 0x00008000, LENGTH = 0x8000
}

SECTIONS
{

.init : {*(.init)}>init //Change 3

    .text :
    {
            _ftext = .;
            *(.text .stub .text.* .gnu.linkonce.t.*)
            _etext = .;
    } > pmem
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