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#include<stdio.h>
#include<malloc.h>

typedef struct node_t {
    int i;
    struct node_t* link;
} node;

node* head = NULL;

int main() {
    int i = 10;
    node* temp = NULL;
    head = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node));
    temp = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node));
    if(temp == NULL) {
        printf("\n malloc for temp node failed! \n");
    }
    else {
        /* linked list logic to add the elements in the beginning */
        while(i<=10) {
            temp->i = i;
            temp->link = NULL;
            if(head == NULL) {
                head = temp;
            }
            else {
                temp->link = head;
                head = temp;
            }
            i++;
        }
    }
    for(temp = head; temp->link != NULL; temp = temp->link) {
        printf("\n The data is:%d \n",temp->i);
    }
    free(temp);
    free(head);
    return 0;
}

I'm trying a simple linked list program. I'm not getting the output.

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closed as too localized by raina77ow, qrdl, WhozCraig, Stefan Gehrig, DocMax Nov 29 '12 at 8:35

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What is "no output"? Not printing, not getting the expected result, anything else?.. –  icepack Nov 29 '12 at 7:48
    
The solution here would be to add printf statements until you do see output. Which lines get executed would provide insight. –  Potatoswatter Nov 29 '12 at 7:50
    
There's so much wrong. You realize that your code will link the "same" node into the array 10 times, right? –  Nik Bougalis Nov 29 '12 at 7:51
    
To sum it up: your code doesn't work because it doesn't make any sense at all. You allocate memory for head then check for NULL... if it was allocated, then you copy its garbage contents into temp. Why you allocate memory for both head and temp is also beyond me. And the loop is just weird. –  Lundin Nov 29 '12 at 7:51
    
The while loop bug here would have been just trivial to find with a debugger. A breakpoint inside the loop would show that the index was not changing. –  Martin James Nov 29 '12 at 7:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

1) You have to allocate node (tmp) each time you are assigning value to tmp. and not allocate only one time the tmp. See the following fixed code to see how to do it

2) the following for loop is wrong:

for(temp = head; temp->link != NULL; temp = temp->link) {

This for loop is fixed in the following code

3) for the free you have to browse the whole linked list and then free each node. see the following fixed code.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<malloc.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

typedef struct node_t{
    int i;
     struct node_t* link;
}node;

node* head = NULL;

int main(){
     int i = 1;
     node* temp = NULL;

     /* linked list logic to add the elements in the beginning */
     while(i<=10){
         temp = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node));
         if(temp == NULL){
             printf("\n malloc for temp node failed! \n");
             exit(1);
         }
         temp->i = i;
         temp->link = NULL;
         if(head == NULL){
             head = temp;
         }
         else{
             temp->link = head;
             head = temp;
         }
         i++;
     }

     for(temp = head; temp != NULL; temp = temp->link){
         printf("\n The data is:%d \n",temp->i);
     }

     while (head!=NULL)
     {
        temp = head->link;
        free(head);
        head = temp;
     }

}
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Thanks. I have done a lot of mistakes. Now I understand why the mistakes are. Thanks –  Angus Nov 29 '12 at 9:25

You seem to have an infinite loop! (the value of i is not changed)

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You are not changing the value of variable i in the while loop as a result you never come out of the while loop.

You need something like:

int i=1;
while(i<=10){
  // insert i in loop
  i++;
}
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2  
There's more that's wrong... For one thing, he links the same thing to itself 10 times. –  Nik Bougalis Nov 29 '12 at 7:50

You are not changing the value of loop variable i.e. i.

Also you need to do malloc inside while loop to create separate nodes. Right now, your code is modifying the same node again and again.

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In addition to the node about the infinite loop, since you never modify the value of i there's something else that's wrong.

 22         /* linked list logic to add the elements in the beginning */
 23         while(i<=10){
 24             temp->i = i;
 25             temp->link = NULL;
 26             if(head == NULL){
 27                 head = temp;
 28             }
 29             else{
 30                 temp->link = head;
 31                 head = temp;

Look at what you are doing in this loop. If head is NULL (it's very unlikely to be, since you allocated it back in line 15, although it's possible that the allocation could fail) you set 'head' to temp.

If head is not NULL, you set temp's 'link' to head. Then you set head to temp. Then you loop and do it all over again.

So you end up with head pointing to temp, and temp->link pointing to temp... a circular list of exactly one node.

Try this instead:

int main()
{   
    int i = 0;
    node *temp;

    /* linked list logic to add the elements in the beginning */
    while(i != 10) 
    {
        /* First, allocate a new node */
        temp = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node));

        if(temp == NULL) 
            return -1; /* yikes */

        /* now set its value */
        temp->i = i++;

        /* and link it into the list, at the beginning */
        temp->link = head;
        head = temp;        
     }

     /* Now traverse the list, starting from 'head' */
     temp = head;

     while(temp != NULL)
     {
        /* save the current node in a temporary variable */
        node *temp2 = temp;

        /* and move 'temp' to point to the next node in the list */
        temp = temp->link;

        /* print the current node */
        printf("\n The data is: %d\n", temp2->i);

        /* and free the memory */
        free(temp2);
     }   

     return 0;
}
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1  
Thanks a lot. I have understood my mistakes –  Angus Nov 29 '12 at 9:24

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