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C++: rationale behind hiding rule

Suppose I have a code:

class  A
{       
    public:
    void f(int s) {}
};



class B:public A
{      
    public:
    void f() {}
};

int main()
{      B ob;
   ob.f(4);
} 

Then in this case compiler generates an error that "no matching function for call to ‘B::f(int)'" But class B has inherited A as public so B must have the function "void f(int s)". Dont know why compiler is generating error here?

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You should not ask "how does the compiler" but "what are the rules in C++ that...". –  Mark Garcia Nov 29 '12 at 7:58
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marked as duplicate by In silico, Bo Persson, sashoalm, WhozCraig, avasal Nov 29 '12 at 8:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers

That is because B defines a different f, which hides the f inherited from A. If you want both available in B (which is likely), you must bring it into scope with a using-declaration:

class B : public A
{
  void f() {}
  using A::f;
};

This behaviour is specified in [class.member.loopkup], especially paragrah 4.

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That is, if you want to overload A::f(int)' with B::f()`, you must do the above. –  Mark Garcia Nov 29 '12 at 7:56
    
+1 "Hiding" is the correct term here. –  In silico Nov 29 '12 at 7:57
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When you declare void f() in B, this hides the void f(int) inherited from A. You can bring it back into scope with using:

class B: public A
{      
public:
    void f() {}
    using A::f;
};
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@LuchianGrigore: Thanks, answer updated. –  NPE Nov 29 '12 at 7:57
    
These two answers are very much the same. –  Mark Garcia Nov 29 '12 at 7:57
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This is called Hiding - you can check the C++ FAQ Entry. It describes the problem and the solution.

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