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I knew that on WS2K8R2 the new default start port is 49152, and the default end port is 65535 for both TCP and UDP for both IPV4 and IPV6. I wonder if I can safely expand the dynamic range to: 1025 - 65535. Is it safe if I do so. If it's not safe, any concerns?

Thanks!

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closed as off topic by glglgl, John Topley, stusmith, Tragedian, Linus Kleen Nov 29 '12 at 13:35

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There are a growing number of protocols that use ports in the thousands range (eg: vnc on TCP/5900)... expanding the ports used by the OS for TCP connections might result in a collision if you're starting vnc while a client is connected on the specific port. In general, do you really think you're going to have more than 10k concurrent connections? (This question would probably get a better answer on SU than here on SO.) –  utopianheaven Nov 29 '12 at 8:31

2 Answers 2

Anything in range of 49152-65535 is unreservable port numbers in IANA, so these numbers are generally safe. So using this safe range means it is less likely to collide with any running apps and thus, reduce the time to find a good port number.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_TCP_and_UDP_port_numbers#Dynamic.2C_private_or_ephemeral_ports

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No. You need to take a good look at RFC 1700 and its current successor at IANA. All the ports mentioned in those documents are reserved for the applications specified and should not normally be used by other applications.

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