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Is there a way I can find out the name of my default web browser using C#? (Firefox, Google Chrome, etc..)

Can you please show me with an example?

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up vote 16 down vote accepted

You can look here for an example, but mainly it can be done like this:

internal string GetSystemDefaultBrowser()
{
    string name = string.Empty;
    RegistryKey regKey = null;

    try
    {
        //set the registry key we want to open
        regKey = Registry.ClassesRoot.OpenSubKey("HTTP\\shell\\open\\command", false);

        //get rid of the enclosing quotes
        name = regKey.GetValue(null).ToString().ToLower().Replace("" + (char)34, "");

        //check to see if the value ends with .exe (this way we can remove any command line arguments)
        if (!name.EndsWith("exe"))
            //get rid of all command line arguments (anything after the .exe must go)
            name = name.Substring(0, name.LastIndexOf(".exe") + 4);

    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        name = string.Format("ERROR: An exception of type: {0} occurred in method: {1} in the following module: {2}", ex.GetType(), ex.TargetSite, this.GetType());
    }
    finally
    {
        //check and see if the key is still open, if so
        //then close it
        if (regKey != null)
            regKey.Close();
    }
    //return the value
    return name;

}
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1  
When I set internet explorer as default browser, it doesn't seem to work for me. :/ That particular registry location isn't updated to point to IE. – Steven Jeuris Jul 11 '13 at 13:35
    
This method does not appear to work any more. – tofutim Jan 17 '14 at 1:49
    
@tofutim Could you elaborate that a bit more? – Mario Sannum Jan 17 '14 at 7:52
1  
On my Win 8.1 machine, this technique pulls up Firefox (with the accompanying message that Firefox is NOT the default browser). This should be a fallback (for older OS) to Jeuris' answer (requires a bit of editing to work). – tofutim Jan 17 '14 at 17:49

The currently accepted answer does not work for me when internet explorer is set as the default browser. On my Windows 7 PC the HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\http\shell\open\command is not updated for IE. The reason behind this might be changes introduced starting from Windows Vista in how default programs are handled.

You can find the default chosen browser in the registry key, Software\Microsoft\Windows\Shell\Associations\UrlAssociations\http\UserChoice, with value Progid. (thanks goes to Broken Pixels)

const string userChoice = @"Software\Microsoft\Windows\Shell\Associations\UrlAssociations\http\UserChoice";
string progId;
BrowserApplication browser;
using ( RegistryKey userChoiceKey = Registry.CurrentUser.OpenSubKey( userChoice ) )
{
    if ( userChoiceKey == null )
    {
        browser = BrowserApplication.Unknown;
        break;
    }
    object progIdValue = userChoiceKey.GetValue( "Progid" );
    if ( progIdValue == null )
    {
        browser = BrowserApplication.Unknown;
        break;
    }
    progId = progIdValue.ToString();
    switch ( progId )
    {
        case "IE.HTTP":
            browser = BrowserApplication.InternetExplorer;
            break;
        case "FirefoxURL":
            browser = BrowserApplication.Firefox;
            break;
        case "ChromeHTML":
            browser = BrowserApplication.Chrome;
            break;
        default:
            browser = BrowserApplication.Unknown;
            break;
    }
}

In case you also need the path to the executable of the browser you can access it as follows, using the Progid to retrieve it from ClassesRoot.

const string exeSuffix = ".exe";
string path = progId + @"\shell\open\command";
FileInfo browserPath;
using ( RegistryKey pathKey = Registry.ClassesRoot.OpenSubKey( path ) )
{
    if ( pathKey == null )
    {
        return;
    }

    // Trim parameters.
    try
    {
        string path = pathKey.GetValue( null ).ToString().ToLower().Replace( "\"", "" );
        if ( !path.EndsWith( exeSuffix ) )
        {
            path = path.Substring( 0, path.LastIndexOf( exeSuffix, StringComparison.Ordinal ) + exeSuffix.Length );
            browserPath = new FileInfo( path );
        }
    }
    catch
    {
        // Assume the registry value is set incorrectly, or some funky browser is used which currently is unknown.
    }
}
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This is getting old, but I'll just add my own findings for others to use. The value of HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Clients\StartMenuInternet should give you the default browser name for this user.

If you want to enumerate all installed browsers, use HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Clients\StartMenuInternet

You can use the name found in HKEY_CURRENT_USER to identify the default browser in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE and then find the path that way.

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I just made a function for this:

    public void launchBrowser(string url)
    {
        string browserName = "iexplore.exe";
        using (RegistryKey userChoiceKey = Registry.CurrentUser.OpenSubKey(@"Software\Microsoft\Windows\Shell\Associations\UrlAssociations\http\UserChoice"))
        {
            if (userChoiceKey != null)
            {
                object progIdValue = userChoiceKey.GetValue("Progid");
                if (progIdValue != null)
                {
                    if(progIdValue.ToString().ToLower().Contains("chrome"))
                        browserName = "chrome.exe";
                    else if(progIdValue.ToString().ToLower().Contains("firefox"))
                        browserName = "firefox.exe";
                    else if (progIdValue.ToString().ToLower().Contains("safari"))
                        browserName = "safari.exe";
                    else if (progIdValue.ToString().ToLower().Contains("opera"))
                        browserName = "opera.exe";
                }
            }
        }

        Process.Start(new ProcessStartInfo(browserName, url));
    }
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