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I'm using postgresql 9.2.1 on Oracle Linux Server release 6.3.

I'm working on get anticipated storage size for table and index.

Thanks to some advices from this site, I made my fomula for table like below...

-- In case of TABLE...

postgres=# \d test
           Table "public.test"
    Column     |         Type          | Modifiers 
---------------+-----------------------+-----------
 c1            | integer               | not null
 c2            | character varying(20) | not null
 c3            | character varying(8)  | not null
 c4            | character varying(6)  | not null
 c5            | character varying(15) | 
 c6            | character varying(20) | 
 c7            | character varying(20) | 
 c8            | character varying(20) | 
Indexes:
    "idx_test" PRIMARY KEY, btree (c1, c3, c4, c5)
Tablespace: "test"

postgres=# insert into test values(1, 
                                   '11111111111111111111', -- 20(exactly same with max length of each column)
                                   '11111111',             -- 8
                                   '111111',               -- 6
                                   '111111111111111',      -- 15
                                   '11111111111111111111', -- 20
                                   '11111111111111111111', -- 20
                                   '11111111111111111111');-- 20
INSERT 0 1

postgres=# select * from pgstattuple('test');           
 table_len | tuple_count | tuple_len | tuple_percent | dead_tuple_count | dead_tuple_len | dead_tuple_percent | free_space | free_percent                          
-----------+-------------+-----------+---------------+------------------+----------------+--------------------+------------+--------------
      8192 |           1 |        81 |          0.99 |                0 |              0 |                  0 |       8072 |        98.54 

postgres=# insert into test values(2, 
                                   '11111111111111111111', -- 20(exactly same with max length of each column)
                                   '11111111',             -- 8
                                   '111111',               -- 6
                                   '111111111111111',      -- 15
                                   '11111111111111111111', -- 20
                                   '11111111111111111111', -- 20
                                   '11111111111111111111');-- 20      
INSERT 0 1

postgres=# select * from pgstattuple('test');
 table_len | tuple_count | tuple_len | tuple_percent | dead_tuple_count | dead_tuple_len | dead_tuple_percent | free_space | free_percent 
-----------+-------------+-----------+---------------+------------------+----------------+--------------------+------------+--------------
      8192 |           2 |       162 |          1.98 |                0 |              0 |                  0 |       7980 |        97.41                    

So, I figured out that each page can hold 88(X) number of tuples.

  • tuple size in actual storage : 8072(free_space after 1st insertion)-7980(free_space after 2nd insertion) = 92
  • page default = 8192 - 8072(free_space after 1st insertion) - 92(tuple size) = 28
  • 9182 - 28 = 92 * X(max number of tuples in each page)

In case of index...

postgres=# \d test_pkey
           Index "public.idx_test"
    Column     |         Type          |  Definition   
---------------+-----------------------+---------------
 c1            | integer               | c1
 c2            | character varying(20) | c2
 c3            | character varying(8)  | c3
 c4            | character varying(6)  | c4
primary key, btree, for table "public.test"

postgres=# truncate table test;
postgres=# vacuum;
postgres=# analyze;

postgres=# insert into test values(1, 
                                   '11111111111111111111', -- 20(exactly same with max length of each column)
                                   '11111111',             -- 8
                                   '111111',               -- 6
                                   '111111111111111',      -- 15
                                   '11111111111111111111', -- 20
                                   '11111111111111111111', -- 20
                                   '11111111111111111111');-- 20
INSERT 0 1

postgres=# select * from pgstattuple('idx_test');
 table_len | tuple_count | tuple_len | tuple_percent | dead_tuple_count | dead_tuple_len | dead_tuple_percent | free_space | free_percent 
-----------+-------------+-----------+---------------+------------------+----------------+--------------------+------------+--------------
     16384 |           1 |        56 |          0.34 |                0 |              0 |                  0 |       8088 |        49.37
(1 row)

postgres=# select * from pgstatindex('idx_test');
 version | tree_level | index_size | root_block_no | internal_pages | leaf_pages | empty_pages | deleted_pages | avg_leaf_density | leaf_fragmentation 
---------+------------+------------+---------------+----------------+------------+-------------+---------------+------------------+--------------------
       2 |          0 |       8192 |             1 |              0 |          1 |           0 |             0 |             0.79 |                  0
(1 row)

postgres=# insert into test values(1, 
                                   '11111111111111111111', -- 20(exactly same with max length of each column)
                                   '11111111',             -- 8
                                   '111111',               -- 6
                                   '111111111111111',      -- 15
                                   '11111111111111111111', -- 20
                                   '11111111111111111111', -- 20
                                   '11111111111111111111');-- 20

INSERT 0 1       

postgres=# select * from pgstattuple('idx_test');                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
 table_len | tuple_count | tuple_len | tuple_percent | dead_tuple_count | dead_tuple_len | dead_tuple_percent | free_space | free_percent
-----------+-------------+-----------+---------------+------------------+----------------+--------------------+------------+--------------             
     16384 |           2 |       112 |          0.68 |                0 |              0 |                  0 |       8028 |           49              
(1 row)                                                                                                                                                

postgres=# select * from pgstatindex('idx_test');                                                                                            
 version | tree_level | index_size | root_block_no | internal_pages | leaf_pages | empty_pages | deleted_pages | avg_leaf_density | leaf_fragmentation 
---------+------------+------------+---------------+----------------+------------+-------------+---------------+------------------+--------------------
       2 |          0 |       8192 |             1 |              0 |          1 |           0 |             0 |             1.52 |                  0 
(1 row)        

Again, I figured out that each page can hold 135(Y) number of tuples.

  • tuple size in actual storage : 8088(free_space after 1st insertion)-8028(free_space after 2nd insertion) = 60
  • page default = 8192 - 8088(free_space after 1st insertion) - 60(tuple size) = 44
  • 8192 - 44 = 60 * Y(max number of tuples in each page)

When I insert 1350 rows in the table.... I got this...

postgres=# select * from pgstattuple('test');
 table_len | tuple_count | tuple_len | tuple_percent | dead_tuple_count | dead_tuple_len | dead_tuple_percent | free_space | free_percent 
-----------+-------------+-----------+---------------+------------------+----------------+--------------------+------------+--------------
    131072 |        1350 |    109350 |         83.43 |                0 |              0 |                  0 |       6424 |          4.9
(1 row)


postgres=# select * from pgstattuple('idx_test');
 table_len | tuple_count | tuple_len | tuple_percent | dead_tuple_count | dead_tuple_len | dead_tuple_percent | free_space | free_percent 
-----------+-------------+-----------+---------------+------------------+----------------+--------------------+------------+--------------
     90112 |        1350 |     54000 |         59.93 |                0 |              0 |                  0 |      13580 |        15.07
(1 row)

postgres=# select * from pgstatindex('idx_test');
 version | tree_level | index_size | root_block_no | internal_pages | leaf_pages | empty_pages | deleted_pages | avg_leaf_density | leaf_fragmentation 
---------+------------+------------+---------------+----------------+------------+-------------+---------------+------------------+--------------------
       2 |          1 |      81920 |             3 |              0 |          9 |           0 |             0 |            81.49 |                  0
(1 row)     

File size of table?

1350(number of rows) / 88(X) = 15.34 --> This means 16 page is needed which means the file size is of 16*8192 = 131072. It looks right.

However, index sise is different...

1350(number of rows) / 135(Y) = 10 exactly... 10*8192 is needed file size but 90112.

Inserting 1 more row, In Addition to that, the index_size should be extended (if i'm right) so I tried but no changes.

postgres=# insert into test values(27108,'sanjuk1052','20121022','233338','172,20,30,177','win7','IE','9,0');
INSERT 0 1
postgres=# select * from pgstattuple('test');
 table_len | tuple_count | tuple_len | tuple_percent | dead_tuple_count | dead_tuple_len | dead_tuple_percent | free_space | free_percent 
-----------+-------------+-----------+---------------+------------------+----------------+--------------------+------------+--------------
    131072 |        1351 |    109431 |         83.49 |                0 |              0 |                  0 |       6332 |         4.83
(1 row)

postgres=# select * from pgstattuple('idx_test');
 table_len | tuple_count | tuple_len | tuple_percent | dead_tuple_count | dead_tuple_len | dead_tuple_percent | free_space | free_percent 
-----------+-------------+-----------+---------------+------------------+----------------+--------------------+------------+--------------
     90112 |        1351 |     54040 |         59.97 |                0 |              0 |                  0 |      13536 |        15.02
(1 row)

postgres=# select * from pgstatindex('idx_test');
 version | tree_level | index_size | root_block_no | internal_pages | leaf_pages | empty_pages | deleted_pages | avg_leaf_density | leaf_fragmentation 
---------+------------+------------+---------------+----------------+------------+-------------+---------------+------------------+--------------------
       2 |          1 |      81920 |             3 |              0 |          9 |           0 |             0 |            81.55 |                  0
(1 row)

I can't even sure this kind of approach is reasonable but the job has to be done even though is's not perfect...

I need my own fomula especially for getting index size anticipated including additional file resluted by TOAST...

Any advice would be very appreciated.

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1 Answer

One of the real problems that you have here is that varchar doesn't use a constant amount of space. This will possibly throw your page estimates off over time (your estimates are essentially a maximum and may be less). With your table structure I don't think anything will ever be toasted.

This will impact your index also because of the fact that you have variable length fields. Thus you can expect that your estimates represent a maximum, not known accurate amount. The actual size will depend on your actual data, not merely the schema and number of rows.

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