Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a 7*7 matrix containing 0s and 1s in which each (x,y) will be checked for how many of its neighbors are a 1. I am a beginner to python, and will only be using basic programming procedures.

I have:

for x in range(rows):
        for y in range(cols):
            lives = 0
            lives = neighbors(matrix, rows, cols)

def neighbors(matrix, rows, cols):

            if matrix[x][y+1] == 1:
                lives += 1
            if matrix[x-1][y+1] == 1:
                lives += 1
            #All 8 positions are checked like this
    return lives

I am getting the ol indexing error. This seems like a very simple problem I just can't seem to figure out how to fix it.

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First of all, the index error occurs when you do y+1. Since you are going in the range of the amount of cols, this will end up being cols+1, which is out of range. What you can do is use a try-except block, or make sure it doesn't get out of range through only looping to cols-1.

Additionally your function definition is redundant, since you don't use all your input parameters, and you access the x and y variables in the global scope. The easiest thing to do is probably just to remove the definition and the return-statement.

This should work:

for x in range(rows):
    for y in range(cols-1): #Loop until the second to last element.
        lives = 0
        if matrix[x][y+1] == 1:
            lives += 1
        if x == 0:  #You probably don't want to check x-1 = -1
            continue 
        if matrix[x-1][y+1] == 1:
            lives += 1
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I knew it was something simple I was overlooking. I got it working. –  user1862529 Dec 3 '12 at 5:20
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.