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I have an inline function definition that wraps an inline assembly. I wish to choose different inline assembly implementation based on the fact whether or not the argument is known in build time or not.

My question is how to ask in C code or inline assembly whether an address value is an known at build time and therefore fit to be an immediate value. If you are thinking __builtin_constant_p - please do read ahead.

Here is a bit of code that illustrates my intent:. I am trying to find a way to implement "is_immediate".

static char arr[5];

void __attribute__((always_inline)) do_something(char * buf)
{
   if(is_immediate(buf) {

        // Argument is constant, can use immediate form

        asm volatile ("insn1 %0" : : "i"(buf));

   } else {

        // Argument is computed at runtime, use a register

        unsigned long tmp = (unsigned long)buf + 1;

        asm volatile("insn2 %0" : : "r"(tmp));

}


int main(void) 
{
   do_something(&arr);
}

At first impression __builtin_constant_p() seems like it is exactly the right bit of magic needed, except it does not work.

The reason is does not work is that while the address of the array will be known after the linker has placed the array in memory and chosen an address for it (and so it does fit the immediate constraint of the inline assembly), it is not known at compile time before the link.

So, what I am looking for is a way to ask - "is this variable fit to be an immediate value?" rather then "is this a constant expression?".

share|improve this question
2  
The types don't match up. Why is the argument char *, and not char (*)[5]? –  Kerrek SB Nov 29 '12 at 9:01
    
@KerrekSB Please note I'm sending the address of arr as an argument, not arr itself. –  gby Nov 29 '12 at 9:10
1  
@gby That's the point I think. Passing arr would be like passing &arr[0] = char* since array object gets converted during lvalue-to-rvalue conversion. OTOH &arr is already an rvalue of type char(*)[5] because arr is of type char[5]. –  Kos Nov 29 '12 at 9:39
1  
tl;dr an array decays to a pointer-to-first-member when you use it as an rvalue, so when passing to a function or doing arr[i] or assigning it to a pointer, but not when doing &arr since & works on Lvalues. –  Kos Nov 29 '12 at 14:19
1  
@Kos I would argue but I don't see how it is relevant to my question - the result is the same whether I use arr or &arr so I'll just shut up now. –  gby Nov 29 '12 at 14:25

1 Answer 1

If I have a look on what is produced by my x86 compiler (where this insn doesn't make sense after all), it is here:

static char arr[5];

void __attribute__((always_inline)) do_something(char * buf)
{

        // Argument is constant, can use immediate form

        asm volatile ("insn1 %0" : : "r"(buf));

        unsigned long tmp = (unsigned long)buf;

        asm volatile("insn2 %0" : : "r"(tmp));

}


int main(void)
{
   char brr[5];
   do_something(arr);
   do_something(brr);
}

comes to

        .file   "inl.c"
        .text
.globl do_something
        .type   do_something, @function
do_something:
        pushl   %ebp
        movl    %esp, %ebp
        movl    8(%ebp), %eax
#APP
# 8 "inl.c" 1
        insn1 %eax
# 0 "" 2
# 12 "inl.c" 1
        insn2 %eax
# 0 "" 2
#NO_APP
        popl    %ebp
        ret
        .size   do_something, .-do_something
.globl main
        .type   main, @function
main:
        pushl   %ebp
        movl    $arr, %eax
        movl    %esp, %ebp
        subl    $16, %esp
#APP
# 8 "inl.c" 1
        insn1 %eax
# 0 "" 2
# 12 "inl.c" 1
        insn2 %eax
# 0 "" 2
#NO_APP
        leal    -5(%ebp), %eax
#APP
# 8 "inl.c" 1
        insn1 %eax
# 0 "" 2
# 12 "inl.c" 1
        insn2 %eax
# 0 "" 2
#NO_APP
        leave
        ret
        .size   main, .-main
        .local  arr
        .comm   arr,5,4
        .ident  "GCC: (SUSE Linux) 4.5.1 20101208 [gcc-4_5-branch revision 167585]"
        .section        .comment.SUSE.OPTs,"MS",@progbits,1
        .string "OSpwg"
        .section        .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

so I think it could make sense to be immediate as $arr is probably immediate (while leal -5(%ebp), %eax isn't). Probably the said optimization just isn't supported.

But on the other hand,

            movl    $arr, %eax
            insn1 %eax

is not soo much worse than

            insn1 $arr

so that it is still acceptable, IMHO.

share|improve this answer
    
You are right that 2 instruction don't seem much compared to one for most uses. I happen to write very tight embedded and real time code where every cycle counts. I agree that this is not usually the case, though. –  gby Nov 29 '12 at 13:33
    
@gby You could add a macro which ends up having an asm statement with "i" - that should be more feasible than an inline one. You could keep the above as an alternative for being used in the case of calculated or stack-based addresses. –  glglgl Nov 29 '12 at 13:51
    
the inline function does not actually change anything - hand coding or using a macro does not change the behaviour –  gby Nov 29 '12 at 15:40
    
@gby mmm... with #define do_something_with_imm(buf) do { asm volatile("insn2 %0" : : "i"(buf)); } while (0) I got the desired behaviour. If I call it with the static arr, it works fine, if I call it with by brr lying on the stack, it fails. As intended. –  glglgl Nov 29 '12 at 16:28
    
if you put the asm volatile in an inline function with no if statement it will work just the same. An array on the stack does not have a constant address so no wonder it does not work. –  gby Nov 29 '12 at 19:10

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