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In Objective C how do I explicitly release an object owned by another object? Or perhaps equivalently inform the owning object that it does not own the child object anymore. Consider the following:

- (void) testWithNSString:(NSString *)val
{
  NSData *data = [val dataUsingEncoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding];
  // ...
  // now I want to explicitly release data e.g. due to low memory
}

In [val dataUsingEncoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding] an NSData object is returned and I assume (due to general conventions of ownership) that it will be released, when val is released. This seems acceptable from a non-leaking perspective. But this strategy raises two issues:

  1. What if I want to explicitly release data object immediately e.g. due to low memory?
  2. What if I do not want the caller of testWithNSString to be left with an NSString val object (after the testWithNSString has returned), which suddently has ownership of new objects?
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As long as you dont allocate memory, you dont have to worry about that since OS will take care of it. When low memory is encountered, it will anyway release these params. And when you are returning from this method, all local variables will be released. –  iDev Nov 29 '12 at 9:47
    
@ACB I don't think so. dataUsingEncoding: returns an autoreleased NSData. It will be released at the end of the run loop, not when returning from the method. –  DrummerB Nov 29 '12 at 9:52
    
@DrummerB, Yup. I didnt mention it literally. My point was, he doesnt have to worry about that staying in memory forever. Actual working of autorelease is what you have mentioned. –  iDev Nov 29 '12 at 19:00
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In [val dataUsingEncoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding] an NSData object is returned and I assume (due to general conventions of ownership) that it will be released, when val is released

This is incorrect. dataUsingEncoding will create a new NSData object that has no relationship with val (as to lifetime). It is an autoreleased object and it will be released at the next cycle of the run loop (approx, we don't know exactly), unless you retain it somehow.

What if I want to explicitly release data object immediately e.g. due to low memory?

If you want the object to be released immediately, and you are using ARC, you can simply assign nil to its pointer:

data = nil;

If you are not using ARC, your best option is to wait for the run loop autorelease pool to do its job. Or you can create a local autorelease pool in your method, so that autoreleased objects are drained at the end of the method and not at the next run loop cycle. This will make a difference only in case of long-running methods (or chain of methods), so I don't know if it would make sense in your case.

What if I do not want the caller of testWithNSString to be left with an NSString val object (after the testWithNSString has returned), which suddently has ownership of new objects?

As I said, val has no ownership of data.

Summing this all up, your data object is autoreleased and it will be pretty soon after your method ends (unless it is a long-running method); so data memory will be recovered in an efficient way and I would not worry about it (unless it is a long-running method, as I said).

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This seems good! Does this mean that I can invoke [data release] explicitly? One big question about Objective C documentation: Where can I find that the returned NSData object is not owned by the receiver? –  Jakob Bjerre Jensen Nov 29 '12 at 9:49
    
If you are using ARC (you do not specify that, I don't know in which scenario to reason) you cannot use release altogether; if you are not using ARC, sending release to an autoreleased object will cause a crash. You should use alloc/init to get the data object, then you are the owner of the object and can send release to it; I hope I have been clear enough... –  sergio Nov 29 '12 at 9:52
1  
@JakobBjerreJensen Generally, if you use a class method that starts with the name of the class (like [NSData dataUsingEncoding:x]) you get an autoreleased object. This is a convention and it's almost always true. If it's not, you'll be warned in the documentation. If you create an object using alloc/init or a copy method, you'll always own the object. –  DrummerB Nov 29 '12 at 9:56
    
@JakobBjerreJensen That being said, consider using Automatic Reference Counting (ARC), if you didn't already. You'll almost never have to directly deal with memory managements of objects. –  DrummerB Nov 29 '12 at 9:59
    
@DrummerB (thank you so far for answers). What do you mean by "starts with the name of the class"? dataUsingEncoding does not start with NSData? (but it does start with data). I quess my question boils down to how to read the documentation and how to be certain about the ownership of returned objects. By the way I am on iOS 4, so no ARC. –  Jakob Bjerre Jensen Nov 29 '12 at 10:10
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First of all, you should never ever release an object that you don't own. The returned NSData object will not be released when val is released. The two objects are completely independent (except that data originated from val).

dataUsingEncoding: returns an autoreleased object. That means data will be released at the end of the run loop.

If you are afraid that you will run low on memory and want it to release earlier you can use an NSAutoreleasePool pool:

NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
NSData *data = [val dataUsingEncoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding];
// do something with data.
[pool release];

This will release data when you release the pool.

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Assuming you're using ARC, setting val to nil should release it.

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