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I have the following table entries,

mysql> select id,name from categories;
+----+------------------------+
| id | name                   |
+----+------------------------+
|  8 | Application Process    |
|  9 | Payments               |
| 11 | Account Information    |
| 12 | Customer Support       |
| 13 | Technical Issues       |
| 15 | Most Popular Questions |
+----+------------------------+
6 rows in set (0.01 sec)

I give the following two queries and both gives the same result:

>>> categories.objects.filter(name__exact="payments")[0].name
u'Payments'
>>> c.objects.filter(name__iexact="payments")[0].name
u'Payments'

This is my model:

class categories(models.Model):
 name  = models.CharField(max_length=32)
 parent  = models.ForeignKey('self', null=True, blank=True, related_name='children')
 frequency=models.IntegerField(max_length=10, blank = True, null = True)
 class Meta:
  db_table='categories'

My question is, Why does exact and iexact provide the same result? The why are there two different functions/methods?

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1  
You use "iexact" both times. –  schneck Nov 29 '12 at 9:55
    
it was a typo, corrected now –  Never Back Down Nov 29 '12 at 10:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Seems like you have to change your database collation, as the Django documentation suggests; see also the note about mysql collations. For example, using utf8_general_ci_swedish, there is no case insensitive comparison possible. Try it with utf8_bin.

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