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I try to port a C++ tool to x64 in VS2005. The problem is, that the code contains inline assembly, which is not supported by the 64bit compiler. My question is, if there is much more effort to code it with clear c++ or use intrinsics. But in this case not all assembler functions are available for x64, am I right? Let say, I have a simple program

#include <stdio.h>

void main()
{
   int a = 5;
   int b = 3;
   int res = 0;

    _asm
    {
       mov eax,a
       add eax,b
       mov res,eax
    }

    printf("%d + %d = %d\n", a, b, res);
}

How must I change this code using intrinsics to run it? I'm new in assembler and do not know about most of its functions.

UPDATE:

I made changes to compile assembly with ml64.exe like Hans suggested.

; add.asm

; ASM function called from C++

.code
;---------------------------------------------
AddInt PROC,
    a:DWORD,    ; receives an integer
    b:DWORD     ; receives an integer
; Returns: sum of a and b, in EAX.  
;----------------------------------------------
    mov  eax,a
    add  eax,b
    ret
AddInt ENDP
END 

main.cpp

#include <stdio.h>

extern "C" int AddInt(int a, int b);

void main()
{
    int a = 5;
    int b = 3;
    int res = AddInt(a,b);

    printf("%d + %d = %d\n", a, b, res);
}

but the result is not correct 5 + 3 = -1717986920. I guess, something goes wrong with pointer. Where did I do a mistake?

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2  
Is this example typical of your problem or just a very simple example for your question? I would do my best to remove the assembler and replace it with C/C++. For almost all examples the performance will be comparable (probably better as a modern C compiler is lots cleverer than a human) –  Elemental Nov 29 '12 at 10:23
    
In my project there are lot of assembly parts, so that is a general question –  alex555 Nov 29 '12 at 10:37
    
Intrinsics do not cover the plain instructions, the kind that any C compiler can generate. Only the special instructions in the SSEx sets. You'll need an assembler for this code, ml64.exe –  Hans Passant Nov 29 '12 at 12:24
    
You link the .obj file that the assembler generates. No, it won't be inline anymore. –  Hans Passant Nov 29 '12 at 13:59
    
@HansPassant make your comment the answer. I think a better option isn't available. –  RedX Nov 30 '12 at 10:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Inline assembly isn't supported for 64-bit targets in VC.

Regarding the error in your non-inline code, in a first look the code seems fine. I would look at the generated assembly code from the C++ - to see if it matches the addInt procedure.

Edit: 2 things to note:

  1. Add extern addInt :proc to your asm code.
  2. I'm not aware of an assembly syntax for procedure accepting parameters. The parameters are normally extracted via the stack pointer(sp register) according to your calling convention, see more here: http://courses.engr.illinois.edu/ece390/books/labmanual/c-prog-mixing.html
share|improve this answer
    
On debugging I see that both variables have the same wrong value, before setting to register –  alex555 Nov 30 '12 at 10:49
    
Try adding extern addInt:proc to your asm code –  icepack Nov 30 '12 at 11:03
    
Well, the two parameters of my assembler function can be called by using keywords ecx and edx. And everything is fine. For more information see link. Thank you for your help! –  alex555 Nov 30 '12 at 12:19

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