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The setup:

I have a nested html table structure that displays hierarchical data, and the individual rows can be hidden or shown by the user. Each row has a dom id that is comprised of the level number plus the primary key for the record type on that level. I have to have both, because each level is from a different database table, so the primary key alone is not unique in the dom.

example: id="level-1-row-216"

I am storing the levels and rows of the visible elements in a cookie, so that when the page reloads the same rows the user had open are can be shown automatically. I don't store the full map of dom ids, because I'm concerned about it getting too verbose, and I want to keep my cookie under 4Kb.

So I convert the dom ids to a compact json object like this, with one property for each level, and a unique array of primary keys under each level:

{
    1:[231,432,7656],
    2:[234,121],
    3:[234,2],
    4:[222,423],
    5:[222]
}

With this structure stored in a cookie, I feed it to my show function and restore the user's previous disclosure state when the page loads.

The area for improvement:

I'm looking for better option for reducing my map of id selectors down to this compact format. Here is my function:

function getVisibleIds(){

    // example dom id: level-1-row-216-sub

    var ids = $("tr#[id^=level]:visible").map(function() {
        return this.id;
    });

    var levels = {};

    for(var i in ids ) { 
        var id    = ids[i];
        if (typeof id == 'string'){
            if (id.match(/^level/)){

                // here we extract the number for level and row
                var level = id.replace(/.*(level-)(\d*)(.*)/, '$2');
                var row   = id.replace(/.*(row-)(\d*)(.*)/, '$2');

                // *** Improvement here? ***
                // This works, but it seems klugy. In PHP it's one line (see below):

                if(levels.hasOwnProperty(level)){
                if($.inArray(parseInt(row, 10) ,levels[level]) == -1){
                        levels[level].push(parseInt(row, 10));
                }
                } else {
                    levels[level] = [parseInt(row, 10)];
                }

            }
        }
    }

    return levels;
}

If I were doing it in PHP, I'd build the compact array like this, but I can't figure it out in javascript:

foreach($ids as $id) {
    if (/* the criteria */){
         $level = /* extract it from $id */;
         $row   = /* extract it from $id */;
         $levels[$level][$row];
    }
}
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

so there is some duplicate/unneed stuff in your function:

if you do this

var ids = $("tr#[id^=level]:visible").map(function() {

and this

for(var i in ids ) { 

you are looping twice over your matching ids

isnt id always a string here???

if (typeof id == 'string'){

this shouldnt be necessary, because of your jQuery-Selector: "tr#[id^=level]:visible" your matching elements should ALWAYS start with 'level'

if (id.match(/^level/)){

all in all i think this should be shorter (couldnt test it, please provide a jsfiddle next time, would be easier ;-))

function getVisibleIds(){

  // example dom id: level-1-row-216-sub
  var level, parsed, levels = {};

  $("tr#[id^=level]:visible").map(function() {
    // here we extract the number for level and row
    level   = this.id.replace(/.*(level-)(\d*)(.*)/, '$2');
    parsed  = parseInt(this.id.replace(/.*(row-)(\d*)(.*)/, '$2'), 10);

    // i like this more
    if(!levels.hasOwnProperty(level)) { levels[level] = []; }            
    if($.inArray(parsed, levels[level]) === -1) {
        levels[level].push(parsed);
    }
  });

  return levels;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice, works perfect too. Much more compact, doing the work inside the map function. I'm going to switch this answer to accepted. –  dualmon Nov 29 '12 at 11:27
    
glad you liked it ;-) –  hereandnow78 Nov 29 '12 at 14:49
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My attempt

function getVisibleIds() {

    var parts, level, row, levels = {};

    var ids = $("tr#[id^=level]:visible").each(function (index, el) {

        parts = el.id.split("-"); // no regex :)
        level = parts[1];
        row = parts[3];

        if (!levels[level]) { levels[level] = []; }
        if ($.inArray(row, levels[level]) + 1) { levels[level].push(row); }

    });
    return levels;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Bruno, the selector ends up with more than one id for each row, because there are some various parts of the UI that need hide/show for one row. –  dualmon Nov 29 '12 at 11:23
    
@dualmon Fixed! –  Bruno Nov 29 '12 at 11:29
    
I like what you did there with if( $.inArray( row, levels[level] ) + 1 ) –  dualmon Nov 29 '12 at 11:33
    
Oh, I like split instead of regex too. –  dualmon Nov 29 '12 at 11:34
    
@dualmon Sorry, I know this is slightly different but I was inspired by hereandnow78's answer :) –  Bruno Nov 29 '12 at 11:38
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function getVisibleIds(){

    // example dom id: level-1-row-216-sub

    var levels = {};

    var ids = $("tr#[id^=level]:visible")
                    .map(function() {

                        return this.id;
                    })
                    .each(function (index, id) {

                        if (!id || typeof id !== 'string') {
                            return;
                        }

                        if (id.match(/^level/) === false) {
                            return;
                        }

                        var level = id.replace(/.*(level-)(\d*)(.*)/, '$2');
                        var row   = id.replace(/.*(row-)(\d*)(.*)/, '$2'),
                            primaryKey = parseInt(row, 10);

                        if (!levels[level]) {
                            levels[level] = [];
                        }

                        var arr = levels[level];

                        if (arr.indexOf(primaryKey) === -1) {
                            levels[level].push(primaryKey);

                        }
                    });

    return levels;

}

The key point to note is, you can access a property of an object either using . (dot notation) or as an accessor [].

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, thanks! –  dualmon Nov 29 '12 at 11:14
    
Glad to be of help. Just an aside, the points @hereandnow78 mentions are valid. The checks for id being a string and it beginning with level inside the .each is redundant. I didn't remove them as I felt it didn't really affect the code, and you were looking to simplify the latter part of the code. ... edit: just noticed you switched the accepted answer to his. Good call. –  Amith George Nov 29 '12 at 11:27
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