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I have developed a complex grammar using Antlr 3 using AST tree. ANTLR generates the Lexer and Parser. The problem is that when the user enters a syntax that is not valid for example, the grammar is expecting ';'. The user does not enter this, then in my Eclipse IDE I get the following Exception:

 line 1:24 mismatched input '<EOF>' expecting ';'

How can this Exception be handled because I try to catch this Exception, but the Exception is not catched. Is this an Exception at all? I don't seem to understand why this Exception is not caught. I tried to find out, however the Antlr website seems to be down for some time now.

I looked at the following: ANTLR exception handling with "$", Java and followed that example, but when the Lexer generates the code by adding the RuntimeException(), I get unreachable code.

I am not sure what to do.

When I try to get the number of syntax errors from the parser it displays 0.

EDIT:

I have found a solution that works by looking at: ANTLR not throwing errors on invalid input

However, when I try to get the Exception message back, it is null. Have I set everything up correctly? Please see sample grammar:

grammar i;

options {
output=AST;
}

@header {
package com.data;
}

@rulecatch {
    catch(RecognitionException e) {
        throw e;
   }
}

// by having these below it makes no difference
/**@parser::members {
    @Override
    public void reportError(RecognitionException e) {
        throw new RuntimeException("Exception : " + " " + e.getMessage());
    }
}

@lexer::members {
    @Override
    public void reportError(RecognitionException e) {
       throw new RuntimeException("Exception : " + " " + e.getMessage());
    }
}*/

EDIT:

Please see what I have so far:

grammar i;

options {
output=AST;
}

@header {
package com.data;
}

@rulecatch {
    // ANTLR does not generate its normal rule try/catch
    catch(RecognitionException e) {
        throw e;
    }
}

@parser::members {
    @Override
    public void displayRecognitionError(String[] tokenNames, RecognitionException e) {
        String hdr = getErrorHeader(e);
        String msg = getErrorMessage(e, tokenNames);
        throw new RuntimeException(hdr + ":" + msg);
    }
}

@lexer::members {
    @Override
    public void displayRecognitionError(String[] tokenNames, RecognitionException e) {
        String hdr = getErrorHeader(e);
        String msg = getErrorMessage(e, tokenNames);
        throw new RuntimeException(hdr + ":" + msg);
    }
}

operatorLogic   : 'AND' | 'OR';
value       : STRING;
query       : (select)*;
select      : 'SELECT'^ functions 'FROM table' filters?';';
operator    : '=' | '!=' | '<' | '>' | '<=' | '>=';
filters : 'WHERE'^ conditions;
members : STRING operator value;
conditions  : (members (operatorLogic members)*);
functions   : '*';
STRING  : ('a'..'z'|'A'..'Z')+;
WS      : (' '|'\t'|'\f'|'\n'|'\r')+ {skip();}; // handle white space between keywords

public class Processor {

public Processor() {

}

/**
 * This method builds the MQL Parser.
 * @param args the args.
 * @return the built IParser.
 */
private IParser buildMQLParser(String query) {
    CharStream cs = new ANTLRStringStream(query);
    // the input needs to be lexed
    ILexer lexer = new ILexer(cs);
          CommonTokenStream tokens = new CommonTokenStream();
    IParser parser = new IParser(tokens);
    tokens.setTokenSource(lexer);
    // use the ASTTreeAdaptor so that the grammar is aware to build tree in AST format
    parser.setTreeAdaptor((TreeAdaptor) new ASTTreeAdaptor().getASTTreeAdaptor());
return parser;
}

/**
 * This method parses the MQL query.
 * @param query the query.
 */
public void parseMQL(String query) {
    IParser parser = buildMQLParser(query);
    CommonTree commonTree = null;
    try {
                     commonTree = (CommonTree) parser.query().getTree();
                    }
    catch(Exception e) {
        System.out.println("Exception :" + " " + e.getMessage());
    }
}
}

public class ASTTreeAdaptor {

public ASTTreeAdaptor() {

}

/**
 * This method is used to create a TreeAdaptor.
 * @return a treeAdaptor.
 */
public Object getASTTreeAdaptor() {
    TreeAdaptor treeAdaptor = new CommonTreeAdaptor() {
        public Object create(Token payload) {
        return new CommonTree(payload);
        }
    };
    return treeAdaptor; 
}
}

So when I enter the following: SELECT * FROM table

without a ';' I get the a MismatchedTokenException:

catch(Exception e) {
     System.out.println("Exception : " + " " e);
}

When I try:

e.getMessage();

it returns null.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try overriding displayRecognitionError instead:

@parser::members { 
   ...

    @Override    
    public void displayRecognitionError(String[] tokenNames, RecognitionException e) {
        String hdr = getErrorHeader(e);
        String msg = getErrorMessage(e, tokenNames);
        throw new RuntimeException(hdr + ":" + msg);
    }
    ...
}
//same code in @lexer::members

If you want to track errors rather than abort, you could create a handler interface to track them:

@parser::members { 
   ...
    private YourErrorTrackerInterface errorTracker;

    //getter/setter for errorTracker here        

    @Override    
    public void displayRecognitionError(String[] tokenNames, RecognitionException e) {
        String hdr = getErrorHeader(e);
        String msg = getErrorMessage(e, tokenNames);
        if (errorTracker != null){
          errorTracker.addError(e, tokenNames, hdr, msg);
        }
    }
    ...
}
//same code in @lexer::members

The error tracker could then decide whether to throw an exception or continue.


The code above allows you to track "recoverable" errors, errors that ANTLR can skip over. There are still scenarios that produce unrecoverable errors, such as SELECT * FROM table (without the ending ;). In that case, you'll have to catch the exceptions in parseMQL or somewhere around there. (You could try writing your own recovery code, but I wouldn't recommend that you do.)

Here is a modified parseMQL that shows the two different types of parsing errors. Note that I removed the call to getMessage because not all exceptions derived off of RecognitionException fill it in.

public void parseMQL(String query) {
    iParser parser = buildMQLParser(query);
    CommonTree commonTree = null;
    try {
        commonTree = (CommonTree) parser.query().getTree();
    } catch (MismatchedTokenException e){
        //not production-quality code, just forming a useful message
        String expected = e.expecting == -1 ? "<EOF>" : iParser.tokenNames[e.expecting];
        String found = e.getUnexpectedType() == -1 ? "<EOF>" : iParser.tokenNames[e.getUnexpectedType()];

        System.out.println("Fatal mismatched token exception: expected " + expected + " but was " + found);   

    } catch (RecognitionException e) {
        System.out.println("Fatal recognition exception " + e.getClass().getName()
                + " : " + e);

    } catch (Exception e) {
        System.out.println("Other exception : " + e.getMessage());
    }
}

Input SELECT * FROM table produces message "Fatal mismatched token exception: expected ';' but was <EOF>". This exception was produced directly by ANTLR.

Input SELECT FROM table; produces message "Other exception : line 1:7:missing '*' at 'FROM table'". This exception was produced by the code above.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not work either. When I try to get the message back, I get null back as usual. –  user1646481 Nov 30 '12 at 9:41
    
Please see edit above with what I have now. Maybe I am doing something wrong here. I don't want to track the Exceptions but actually print them. –  user1646481 Nov 30 '12 at 9:56
    
Not sure if this helps: stackoverflow.com/questions/4627244/… –  user1646481 Nov 30 '12 at 14:07
    
@user1646481 Printing errors is a form of tracking them. I updated the answer to show that not all errors can be recovered from and that you'll have to account for them separately. –  user1201210 Nov 30 '12 at 17:18

If I understand correctly you want to handle your language syntax errors. This is how I have this setup on my project.

/**
 * Adapter need for ANTL to recognize our custom nodes
 * 
 * @author Greg
 */
public class PhantomTreeAdaptor extends CommonTreeAdaptor{

    @Override
    public Object create(Token payload){
        return new ASTNode(payload);
    }

    @Override
    public Object dupNode(Object old){
        return (old == null) ? null : ((ASTNode) old).dupNode();
    }

    @Override
    public Object errorNode(TokenStream input, Token start, Token stop, RecognitionException e){
        return new ASTErrorNode(input, start, stop, e);
    }
}

Here is the Error Node

/**
 * This is our custom Error node used by the adapter.
 * 
 * @author Greg
 */
public class ASTErrorNode extends ASTNode {

    org.antlr.runtime.tree.CommonErrorNode delegate;

    public ASTErrorNode(TokenStream input, Token start, Token stop, RecognitionException e) {

        delegate = new CommonErrorNode(input, start, stop, e);

    }

    public boolean isNil() {
        return delegate.isNil();
    }

    public int getType() {
        return delegate.getType();
    }

    public String getText() {
        return delegate.getText();
    }

    public String toString() {

        return delegate.toString();
    }

}

And this is how this is all glued together.

 final PhantomSQLLexer lex = new PhantomSQLLexer(input);

        final CommonTokenStream tokens = new CommonTokenStream(lex);
        final PhantomSQLParser g = new PhantomSQLParser(tokens);
        g.setTreeAdaptor(new PhantomTreeAdaptor());
        final start_rule_return r = g.start_rule();
        if (g.getNumberOfSyntaxErrors() == 0) {
            if (LOGGER.isDebugEnabled()) {
                LOGGER.debug("tree=" + ((Tree) r.tree).toStringTree());
                LOGGER.debug("-------------------------------------------");
            }
            final ASTNode root = r.tree;
            exec(root);            
        }
        else {
            LOGGER.debug("Error parsing input");
        }

We simply created our lexer and parser then we setup our parser with custom Tree adapter (PhantomTreeAdaptor). From there we can check if we have errors in our custom code.

share|improve this answer
    
I also have setup a custom TreeAdaptor, and can get data back from the Tree. With my edit shown above, I can get the type of Exception, but not the message detail back. –  user1646481 Nov 29 '12 at 12:33
    
This answer, does not seem to answer the problem. Not sure what to do as I can get the name of the Exception class, but unable to get the message detail back. –  user1646481 Nov 29 '12 at 12:52
    
If you look 'ASTErrorNode' it contains all the information regarding the RecognitionException Type/Text/ExceptionType its all in there –  Greg Nov 29 '12 at 13:09
    
I will stick stuck. Is there another way of doing this instead of doing a custom one? –  user1646481 Nov 29 '12 at 14:37
    
I don't seem to understand this. With my last edit, what is wrong with it? Why doesn't it work? –  user1646481 Nov 29 '12 at 14:44

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