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Well I have a table with an id for which I need to check if 2 conditions are applicable. Each condition is a set of where clause.

For example, Table1 is the one I need to check.

1st condition:

select t1.id 
from table1 t1, table2 t2, table3 t3 
where 
     condition1,
     condition2,
     condition3

2nd condition:

 select t1.id 
 from table1 t1, table2 t2, table4 t4
 where
     condition1,
     condition4,
     condition5

Now i need to check if the 1st condition or 2nd condition apply on the same id or both. I've been told to use union and add a static value in the select statement for each condition (for ex for 1st condition select t1.id, 1 and for 2nd condition select t1.id, 2) but when i tried it, each row is returning alone for the same table1 id.

The tables are really big and contain millions of records so i need to do this in one sql for better performance, plus I am accessing the results from a C code and since I am not sure about the number of results returned, i will have a really bad performance executing each query alone, saving the results in an array for each one and doing a loop on each array to check for which id both or one condition apply since different processing for each id will be done based on which conditions apply on it.

EDIT example:

 t1 ids: 1, 2, 3, 4

 for id = 1, only condition 1 apply
 for id = 2, only condition 2 apply
 for id = 3, both conditions apply
 for id = 4, no condition apply

I need in the result the following with 1 or 2 random static flags:

  id      1       2
  -----------------
  1      1
  2              2
  3      1       2

I know it sounds messy, I am not even sure it's possible to do it

Thanks a lot :)

share|improve this question
1  
Are you saying you don't want to approach this using the UNION method? One option could be WHERE c1 AND ((c2 AND c3) OR (c4 AND c5)) and then put CASE WHEN (c2 AND c3) THEN 0 ELSE 1 END in a SELECT. BUT I suspect that the OR in the WHERE clause will degrade performance, not improve it, and so using UNION will be better. –  MatBailie Nov 29 '12 at 11:27
    
Can you please provide the data and the expected sample o/p? –  Ajith Sasidharan Nov 29 '12 at 11:31
1  
i don't have a problem using union, only I am not getting the same id in the same result row, for example both conditions 1 and 2 apply for id = 3, I will get first result 1|3 and second result 2|3 –  wassim Nov 29 '12 at 11:31
    
SELECT id, MAX(CASE WHEN newField = 1 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS matchesClause1, MAX(CASE WHEN newField = 2 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS matchesClause2 FROM (Query1 UNION Query2) AS result GROUP BY id [If you have a query that is not returning the results your desire please include that query in your answer, as otherwise we are guessing as to the true nature of your problem.] –  MatBailie Nov 29 '12 at 11:35

5 Answers 5

UPDT

    select t1.id as first, ttt.id as second
    from table1 t1, table2 t2, table3 t3,
(select t1.id 
     from table1 t1, table2 t2, table4 t4
     where
         condition1,
         condition4,
         condition5) ttt
    where 
         condition1,
         condition2,
         condition3
share|improve this answer
    
this will return only the results for which both conditions apply, but I also need to have the ids for which condition 1 apply alone and condition 2 apply alone, thanks –  wassim Nov 29 '12 at 11:29

i think this is a case for explicit joins, e.g. like this:

select
  t1.id,
  case when t2a.id is not null and t3.id is not null then 1 end condition_1st,
  case when t2b.id is not null and t4.id is not null then 1 end condition_2nd
from table1 t1
left join table2 t2a on condition2
left join table3 t3  on condition3
left join table2 t2b on condition4
left join table4 t4  on condition5
where contition1
share|improve this answer

A subquery is one solution, but there is a more elegant (though little-known) way to do it: The intersect clause. It works similar to union, but does a intersection instead of a union.

select t1.id 
from table1 t1, table2 t2, table3 t3 
where 
     condition1,
     condition2,
     condition3
intersect
 select t1.id 
 from table1 t1, table2 t2, table4 t4
 where
     condition1,
     condition4,
     condition5

In a similar manner, minus can be used to find records that only appear in the first query.

select t1.id 
from table1 t1, table2 t2, table3 t3 
where 
     condition1,
     condition2,
     condition3
minus
 select t1.id 
 from table1 t1, table2 t2, table4 t4
 where
     condition1,
     condition4,
     condition5

(swap the queries to find those that only appear in the second query)

To get it all in one query, you have to use a full outer join:

with q1 as (
select t1.id 
from table1 t1, table2 t2, table3 t3 
where 
     condition1,
     condition2,
     condition3),
q2 as (
 select t1.id 
 from table1 t1, table2 t2, table4 t4
 where
     condition1,
     condition4,
     condition5
)
select nvl(q1.id, q2.id) as id,
  case when q1.id is not null then 1 else null end "1",
  case when q2.id is not null then 2 else null end "2"
  from q1 full outer join q2 on q1.id = q2.id
share|improve this answer
    
The second part of your answer seems to be half of what the OP wants, but I doubt the OP would want Query1 minus Query2 and then also have to run Query2 minus Query1. –  MatBailie Nov 29 '12 at 11:32
    
Dems: Provided a possibility to do it all in one, too, but if those records that only appear in Q1 have to be processed differently than those that only appear in Q2, it doesn't hurt that much that two minus statements are necessary. –  ammoQ Nov 29 '12 at 11:37
    
Except that you need to run Q1 twice and Q2 twice (once in Q1 minus Q2 and again in Q2 minus Q1). And the OP is looking for performance gains. It's unlikely that executing each query twice will yield performance gains. –  MatBailie Nov 29 '12 at 11:42
    
My experience with oracle query optimization: try before you buy ;-) –  ammoQ Nov 29 '12 at 11:46

Here is a single query that should do what you want in reasonable time:

with tmp1 as (
    select t1.id
    from table1 t1, table2 t2, table3 t3 
    where 
         condition1,
         condition2,
         condition3
), tmp2 as (
    select t1.id
    from table1 t1, table2 t2, table4 t4
    where
        condition1,
        condition4,
        condition5
)
select distinct t1.id, t2.cond as cond1, t3.cond as cond2
from table1 t1, tmp1 t2, tmp2 t3
where t1.id = t2.id(+)
and t1.id = t3.id(+)
and not (t2.cond is null and t3.cond is null)
;

Note: this is very similar to ammoQ's (more elegant) full outer join answer.

share|improve this answer

It seems that regardless of the queries the best way of flagging that a row has or has not met one or more condition is with a case statement ...

 select id,
        case when condition1 then 1 else 0 end met_condition1,
        case when condition2 then 1 else 0 end met_condition2
 from   my_table
 where  condition1 or
        condition2

Edit:

This formulation is usually my first choice over a (query1 union query 2) method because the optimiser has the option of transforming "condition_1 or condition_2" into union (all) queries, but I don't recall it being able to transform in the opposite direction.

Also the optimiser is not always good at recognising when conditions are mutually exclusive, which would allow a UNION ALL instead of a UNION, and you can get saddled with an unnecessary UNION-driven DISTINCT operation.

The optimiser does not always get it right of course, but dynamic sampling can be a strong positive influence on the decision, particularly where rows can sometimes match both conditions.

Another Edit:

It just occurred to me that in the past where condition1 and condition2 can be satisfied with separate indexes and there is some degree of overlap in their result sets, I've had good experiences with queries of the form ...

 select ...
 from   ...
 where  rowid in (
          select rowid
          from   ...
          where  condition_1
          union
          select rowid
          from   ...
          where  condition_2)

Where there are other conditions that apply regardless of conditions 1 and 2, and which also trim down the data set by a reasonable amount, it can also be helpful to ...

 with baseline as (
    select ...
    from   ...
    where  common_condition_set)
 select ...
 from   baseline
 where  condition_1 or condition_2

or

 with baseline as (
    select ...
    from   ...
    where  common_condition_set)
 select ...
 from   baseline
 where  condition_1
 union
 select ...
 from   baseline
 where  condition_2
share|improve this answer
    
It should be noted that WHERE c1 OR c2 can cause poor execution plans and should be compared to the UNION approach and aggregate. This option is not guaranteed to be more performant than using UNIONs. (That said, it certain is logically correct) –  MatBailie Nov 29 '12 at 11:45
    
Thanks @Dems, I added a further note on that. –  David Aldridge Nov 29 '12 at 12:07
    
thanks :) the query does what i really need but I still need to check the execution time for it comparing to other possible queries. –  wassim Nov 29 '12 at 12:10
    
If this is a query that runs for more than a few seconds then I'd check whether dynamic sampling was invoked or not (the explain plan via DBMS_Stats() will tell you) and if not then consider implementing it. Have a good think about indexes to, as you might be smarter than the optimiser in working out what is possible. –  David Aldridge Nov 29 '12 at 12:22

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