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I am creating a shopping basket class and want products to have an unset amount of options e.g colour, size etc.

I know I should be using multiple tables to house the option data but don't know how to do it. Here's my table structure thus far.

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS options (
        ID varchar(40) PRIMARY KEY,
        Option int,
        Value varchar(100),
        Cost decimal(10,2)
        );

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS products (
        ID int PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
        Title varchar(200),
        Description text,
        Specification text,
        Price decimal(10,2),
        CategoryID int,
        Weight int,
        OptionID int,
        Discount int(2),
        Featured boolean,
        Images text,
        Stock int,
        Related text,
        Offer boolean,
        OfferDetails text,
        Language int
        );
CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS basket (
        `ID` int(11) PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT,
        `ProductID` int(11),
        `Quantity` int(11),
        `OptionID` int(11),
        `Cookie` varchar(40)
        );

I want to store all my options in the options table and link them to the product via one unique ID.

I am guessing I need another table to store the information when users select an option. Then use this table to get select option data from to output to the basket

Also I need to be able to see if the same product i.e same options and productID is already in the basket so I can simply update the quantity instead of adding a new row.

I can do it by using a mass amount of for loops and querys but really want to limit that.

Sorry if un clear.

Thanks in advance

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1 Answer 1

I am assuming that you have another table for customers. The options apply to products. You can have one or more options for each product. this is a many to 1 relationship. You can have multiple products for each user, this is also a many to 1 relationship. You can (should?) break these up relationally.

This table (call it purchase for the example) would hold columns corresponding to the following(at minimum):

primary key,
customer ID,
product ID
amongst other things.

You may see the problem with this initially is that there may be 0 or more options. for that you need another table (call it optSel for the example). This would have columns corresponding to the following (at minimum):

purchase table primary key, 
option id, 
and other things.

then when an option is chosen, it can be thrown in that optSel table. This can later be easily accessed by a join. This links options with the user and the product. You can split it up differently of course, this is only one example of one technique.

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