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Referring to What determines which class definition is included for identically-named classes in two source files?, in which there is a deliberate, clear violation of the One Definition Rule, I am still confused how it is even POSSIBLE for the compiler/linker to have the option of selecting one definition over another.

(ADDENDUM based on answers/comments: I am looking for a single example of how a compiler/linker could produce the result indicated below, given code that is deliberately in violation of the standard and that therefore the code results in undefined behavior.)

The code sample is:

// file1.cpp:

#include <iostream>
#include "file2.h"

struct A
{
    A() : a(1) {}
    int a;
};

int main()
{
    // foo() <-- uncomment this line to draw in file2.cpp's use of class A

    A a; // <-- Which version of class A is chosen by the linker?
    std::cout << a.a << std::endl; // <-- Is "1" or "2" output?
}

...

//file2.h:

void foo();

...

// file2.cpp:

#include <iostream>
#include "file2.h"

struct A
{
    A() : a(2) {}
    int a;
};

void foo()
{
    A a; // <-- Which version of class A is chosen by the linker?
    std::cout << a.a << std::endl; // <-- Is "1" or "2" output?
}

In this case, the function foo() sometimes prints 1, and sometimes 2.

But the constructor for A is inline! It's not a function call! Therefore, I would think that the compiler must include the assembly/machine instructions for the code that instantiates the object a within the compiled code for function foo() itself at the time that the function foo() is compiled.

Therefore, I would think that later, at linking time, the linker will NOT change the assembly/machine instructions for the definition of foo() when it decides to include the function foo() in the compiled binary (since it's only known that foo() is, in fact, being called, at linking time). According to this reasoning, the linker could not possibly influence which inline constructor code is compiled into the function foo(), so it must be file2's version of the inline constructor that is always used, despite the deliberate violation of the One Definition Rule.

If the constructor for A were NOT inline, then I would understand that when the function foo() is compiled, a JUMP statement to a function (the constructor for A) might be placed inside the assembled code for the function foo(); then, later, at linkage time, the linker could then fill in the address of the JUMP statement with its choice of the two definitions of the constructor for A.

The only explanation I can think of for the fact that in reality, sometime foo() prints 1 and sometimes foo() prints 2 despite the presence of the inline constructor is that the compiler, when it compiles "file2.cpp", creates SPACE in the compiled assembly/machine code representing the function foo() for the inline call to the constructor for A, but does not actually fill in the assembly/machine code itself; and that later, at linkage time, the linker copies the code for the constructor for A into the pre-determined location within the compiled definition of the function foo() itself, using its (arbitrary) choice between the two definitions of the inline function for the constructor for A.

Is my explanation correct, or is there another explanation? How is it possible, in this example, despite the deliberate violation of the One Definition Rule, for the compiler/linker to have a choice in which constructor for A is called, given that the constructor call is inline?

ADDENDUM: I changed the title and added a paragraph of clarification near the top, in response to comments and answers, to make it clear that I understand that the behavior is undefined in this example, and that I am looking for a single example of how a real compiler/linker could produce the observed behavior even once. Note that I'm not looking for an answer that predicts what the behavior will be at any particular time.

ADDENDUM 2: In response to a comment, I have placed a breakpoint at the line A a; in the VS debugger and selected the "disassembly" view. Indeed, it is plain as day from the disassembly code that DESPITE the presence of "inline", in this case the compiler has chosen NOT to inline the constructor call for the object a:

Disassembly view of the line `A a; from the code sample in the question: The compiler has chosen not to inline the constructor call, despite its being inline.

Therefore, Alf's answer is correct: Despite the implicit inline of the constructor, the constructor call has NOT been inlined.

A tangential question therefore arises: Can a clear-cut statement be made - one way or the other - regarding whether constructors are less likely to be inlined than regular member functions (assuming inline is present, either explicitly or implicitly, in both cases)? If a statement can be made about this and the answer is "yes, the compiler is more likely to reject inline for a constructor, than it is to reject inline for a regular member function", then a follow-up question would be "why"?

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3  
Maybe it's just an undefined behaviour? –  hate-engine Nov 29 '12 at 12:18
2  
There is no explanation, anything can happen when you violate the rules. Not limited to the compiler inlining either constructor based on some random bits in memory. –  Bo Persson Nov 29 '12 at 12:24
2  
Violating the ODR results in undefined behaviour, which, by definition, can do anything, something, nothing at all and all of the above at the same time. –  Xeo Nov 29 '12 at 12:24
2  
Simple: The C++ Standard said "It's undefined behaviour". That's how it's possible. –  Puppy Nov 29 '12 at 12:26
1  
@Dan: The standard clearly states that you get UB as soon as you violate the ODR. This has nothing to do with compilers or linkers, the UB is just there. –  Xeo Nov 29 '12 at 12:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Defining your constructor in the class definition is equivalent to using the keyword inline and an out-of-class defintion of it.

inline does not require/guarantee inline expansion of machine code. It hints about that, but that's all.

The guaranteed effect of inline is to allow the same definition of the function in multiple translation units (it must then be defined, essentially identically, in all translation units where it's used).

Thus, your logic based on assumption of required/guaranteed inline expansion of calls, yields incorrect conclusions due to incorrect assumption.

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+1 for the inline guaranteed effect –  Stephane Rolland Nov 29 '12 at 12:38
    
Excellent answer. This must be the explanation. –  Dan Nissenbaum Nov 29 '12 at 12:42
    
I have appended to my question a screenshot of the disassembly for one particular build of this code from Visual Studio 2010. The disassembly makes clear that in the particular instance I've captured of the built code, the constructor is not being inlined - your answer is right on the money. –  Dan Nissenbaum Nov 29 '12 at 13:41
    
@DanNissenbaum I know this is an old thread, but I just stumbled uon it and was wondering if your test/screenshot were done when compiling with Debug or Release settings? Because I am pretty sure that VS, when using Debug configuration, does not inline any functions –  baruch Dec 29 '13 at 8:58
    
@baruch This was almost certainly a debug build. –  Dan Nissenbaum Dec 30 '13 at 14:25

I'm really surprised that the code may ever link. I'm almost sure it doesn't link with MS Visual Studio, with the linker complaining about names colliding.

In such cases, you could use anonymous namespaces for the definition of your structs if you really don't want to give them different names.

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The code links and runs, as is (both with foo() present, and with it commented out) in VS 2010. –  Dan Nissenbaum Nov 29 '12 at 12:30
    
Also note that I am not asking how to resolve the problem; I can easily resolve it. This is a deliberate case where I am evaluating undefined behavior. –  Dan Nissenbaum Nov 29 '12 at 12:31
2  
Undefined behaviour means that the behaviour is not defined, as in, any behaviour is as acceptable as is nothing at all. So, evaluating UB is pointless, cause really, anything could happen. –  Tony The Lion Nov 29 '12 at 12:32
1  
@TonyTheLion: as a practical matter, it can help save much time to understand what's going on. both for avoiding UB unpleasantness in the first place, and for identifying UB and getting things fixed. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 29 '12 at 12:34
    
@Tony: it's not pointless at all. Once you work out why you get the behavior you observe, you learn something about your implementation. What you don't learn about, is the standard, because "it's UB" is everything the standard says on the matter. –  Steve Jessop Nov 29 '12 at 12:34

Violations of the ODR do not require diagnostics. That is, if you do it, the behavior of your program is undefined: anything can happen. In the example, the linker probably isn't involved, because all of the member functions are inline, so chances are the code will compile and link without complaint, and do what it looks like it should do. Nevertheless, the standard doesn't promise that that will happen; that's what undefined behavior means.

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It appears your answer is wrong. The linker could be involved. See Alf's answer. –  Dan Nissenbaum Nov 29 '12 at 13:04
    
Your amended question asks how a compiler/linker could produce this result. The mechanism I described is, indeed, how a compiler/linker could produce this result. Why do you say it can't possibly be that? (Note that I amended my answer by adding "probably"; if that's the problem you see, it's been fixed) –  Pete Becker Nov 29 '12 at 13:14
    
How is "anything can happen" an explanation? Alf's answer is an explanation: The compiler might not inline the code, leaving it up to the linker - in other words, the answer is exactly the scenario in which the "probably" you've just included does not apply. I appreciate your fixing the answer to include "probably". –  Dan Nissenbaum Nov 29 '12 at 13:17
    
@DanNissenbaum - it's not. Read the next sentence. –  Pete Becker Nov 29 '12 at 13:19
    
From the next sentence: "chances are the code will compile and link without complaint, and do what it looks like it should do". How is that an explanation? Or is it the first half of the sentence that you believe provides an explanation? –  Dan Nissenbaum Nov 29 '12 at 13:20

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