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I have a log file that looks something like this:

Client connected with ID 8127641241
< multiple lines of unimportant log here>
Client not responding
Total duration: 154.23583
Sent: 14
Received: 9732
Client lost

Client connected with ID 2521598735
< multiple lines of unimportant log here>
Client not responding
Total duration: 12.33792
Sent: 2874
Received: 1244
Client lost

The log contains lots of these blocks starting with Client connected with ID 1234 and ending with Client lost. They are never mixed up (only 1 client at a time).

How would I parse this file and generate statistics like this:

enter image description here

I'm mainly asking about the parsing process, not the formatting.

I guess I could loop over all the lines, set a flag when finding a Client connected line and save the ID in a variable. Then grep the lines, save the values until I find the Client lost line. Is this a good approach? Is there a better one?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A solution in perl

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;

print "\tID\tDuration\tSent\tReceived\n";

while (<>) {
  chomp;
  if (/Client connected with ID (\d+)/) {
    print "$1\t";
  }
  if (/Total duration: ([\d\.]+)/) {
    print "$1\t";
  }
  if (/Sent: (\d+)/) {
    print "$1\t";
  }
  if (/Received: (\d+)/) {
    print "$1\n";
  }
}

Sample output:

        ID  Duration    Sent    Received
8127641241  154.23583   14  9732
2521598735  12.33792    2874    1244
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Here's a quick way using awk:

awk 'BEGIN { print "ID Duration Sent Received" } /^(Client connected|Total duration:|Sent:)/ { printf "%s ", $NF } /^Received:/ { print $NF }' file | column -t

Results:

ID          Duration   Sent  Received
8127641241  154.23583  14    9732
2521598735  12.33792   2874  1244
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If you're sure that the logfile can't have errors, and if the fields are always in the same order, you can use something like the following:

#!/bin/bash

ids=()
declare -a duration
declare -a sent
declare -a received
while read _ _ _ _ id; do
   ids+=( "$id" )
   read _ _ duration[$id]
   read _ sent[$id]
   read _ received[$id]
done < <(grep '\(^Client connected with ID\|^Total duration:\|^Sent:\|Received:\)' logfile)

# printing the data out, for control purposes only
for id in "${ids[@]}"; do
   printf "ID=%s\n\tDuration=%s\n\tSent=%s\n\tReceived=%s\n" "$id" "${duration[$id]}" "${sent[$id]}" "${received[$id]}"
done

Output is:

$ ./parsefile
ID=8127641241
    Duration=154.23583
    Sent=14
    Received=9732
ID=2521598735
    Duration=12.33792
    Sent=2874
    Received=1244

but the data is stored in the corresponding associative arrays. It's fairly efficient. It would probably be slightly more efficient in another programming language (e.g., perl), but since you only tagged your post with bash, sed and grep, I guess I fully answered your question.

Explanation: grep only filters the lines we're interested in, and bash only reads the fields we're interested in, assuming they always come in the same order. The script should be easy to understand and modify to your needs.

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Nice use of grep to pre-filter the file. You could omit the "ids" array and iterate over the keys of the "duration" array: for id in "${!duration[@]}" –  glenn jackman Nov 29 '12 at 14:37

awk:

awk 'BEGIN{print "ID Duration Sent Received"}/with ID/&&!f{f=1}f&&/Client lost/{print a[1],a[2],a[3],a[4];f=0}f{for(i=1;i<=NF;i++){
        if($i=="ID")a[1]=$(i+1)
        if($i=="duration:")a[2]=$(i+1)
        if($i=="Sent:")a[3]=$(i+1)
        if($i=="Received:")a[4]=$(i+1)
}}'log

if there is always an empty line between your data blocks, the awk script above could be simplified to:

 awk -vRS="" 'BEGIN{print "ID Duration Sent Received"}
{for(i=1;i<=NF;i++){
        if($i=="ID")a[1]=$(i+1)
        if($i=="duration:")a[2]=$(i+1)
        if($i=="Sent:")a[3]=$(i+1)
        if($i=="Received:")a[4]=$(i+1)
}print a[1],a[2],a[3],a[4];}' log

output:

ID Duration Sent Received
8127641241 154.23583 14 9732
2521598735 12.33792 2874 1244

if you want to get better format, pipe the output to |column -t

you get:

ID          Duration   Sent  Received
8127641241  154.23583  14    9732
2521598735  12.33792   2874  1244
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Use Paragraph Mode to Slurp Files

Using Perl or AWK, you can slurp in records using a special paragraph mode that uses blank lines between records as a separator. In Perl, use -00 to use paragraph mode; in AWK, you set the RS variable to the empty string (e.g. "") to do the same thing. Then you can parse fields within each record.

Use Line-Oriented Statements

Alternatively, you can use a shell while-loop to read each line at a time, and then use grep or sed to parse each line. You may even be able to use a case statement, depending on the complexity of your parsing.

For example, assuming you always have 5 matching fields in a record, you could do something like this:

while read; do
    grep -Eo '[[:digit:]]+'
done < /tmp/foo | xargs -n5 | sed 's/ /\t/g'

The loop would yield:

23583   14  9732    2521598735  33792
2874    1244    8127641241  23583   14
9732    2521598735  33792   2874    1244

You can certainly play with the formatting, and add header lines, and so forth. The point is that you have to know your data.

AWK, Perl, or even Ruby are better options for parsing record-oriented formats, but the shell is certainly an option if your needs are basic.

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your shell loop would fail for lines that start or end with spaces or contain backslashes. Always use while IFS= read -r line unless you have a very good reason not to and know exactly what you're doing. Also you didn't give grep a target to operate on so the script will hang. Use awk. –  Ed Morton Nov 29 '12 at 14:11

A short snippet of Perl:

perl -ne '
    BEGIN {print "ID Duration Sent Received\n";}
    print "$1 " if /(?:ID|duration:|Sent:|Received:) (.+)$/;
    print "\n" if /^Client lost/;
' filename | column -t
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awk -v RS= -F'\n' '
BEGIN{ printf "%15s%15s%15s%15s\n","ID","Duration","Sent","Received" }
{
   for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) {
      n = split($i,f,/ /)    
      if ( $i ~ /^(Client connected|Total duration:|Sent:|Received:)/ ) {
         printf "%15s",f[n]
      }
   }
   print ""
}'
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