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When I run the .exe being created with the below code in debug mode , it shows some assertion failure and the programme crashes But when i run the same exe created from the release mode of the below code , its working fine.

Please help to identify why I am geting the assertion failure in debug mode but not in release mode .

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
#include<string.h>

void main()
{
    char *buf  = new char[5];   //pre-allocated buffer
    buf = "Hello";
    delete [] buf;
    getchar();
    //cout<<buf;
    //string *p = new (buf) string("hi");  //placement new
    //string *q = new string("hi");  //ordinary heap allocation
}
share|improve this question
    
Note, in this case, you could say char buf[] = "Hello";, and you'd get a copy you wouldn't even have to deallocate. – cHao Nov 29 '12 at 13:38
    
You rarely need C strings in C++, you should use <string> instead. In the few cases where you actually need C headers, you should use the C++ ones instead (e.g.: <cstring>). – netcoder Nov 29 '12 at 13:50
up vote 4 down vote accepted
 char *buf  = new char[5];   //pre-allocated buffer

Here you define a pointer, and initialize it to point to a dynamically allocated buffer with room for 5 characters.

buf = "Hello";

Here you initialize the pointer to point to the beginning of a string literal.

 delete [] buf;

Here you delete[] the buf pointer, but the buf pointer no longer points to anything you new[]'d up, it points to the string literal. You can only delete/delete[] a pointer that points to something you got from new/new[]. So you get undefined behavior, and likely crash

You likely meant to copy the content of your string into the buffer you new[]'d. Remember to account for the nul terminator:

int main()
{
    char *buf  = new char[6];   //pre-allocated buffer
    strcpy(buf, "Hello");
    delete [] buf;
    getchar();
    //cout<<buf;
    //string *p = new (buf) string("hi");  //placement new
    //string *q = new string("hi");  //ordinary heap allocation
}

Though, in C++, you'd rather use std::string from #include <string>;

std::string = "Hello";
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply.. I got the concept now .But why the programme does not crash if it runs in release mode . – vivek Nov 29 '12 at 13:43
    
@viku Hard to tell. When your code does something that's undefined, pretty much anything can happen. It could crash, it could trash your memory, it could appear to work etc. – nos Nov 29 '12 at 14:05
  1. void main is wrong. main returns int. No exceptions.
  2. You're doing delete[] "Hello". "Hello" is a string literal; you can't delete it.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply.. I got the concept now .But why the programme does not crash if it runs in release mode – vivek Nov 29 '12 at 13:46
    
@viku It's undefined behavior - anything can happen. – Joseph Mansfield Nov 29 '12 at 13:59

When you do this:

buf = "Hello";

You're basically changing the pointer value (memory address) at which buf points to a read-only memory area, because "Hello" is a string literal and therefore is stored in read-only memory.

Then you attempt to free that memory, hence the crash.

Also, "Hello" is 6-bytes long, not 5.

share|improve this answer

Because undefined behavior means anything can happen. The problem is that buf = "Hello" assigns the address of a string literal to buf, then tries to delete that literal. When compiled in debug mode the checking code sees that the address can't be deleted; in release mode that check isn't done, and the delete just stomps on something that isn't critical.

share|improve this answer

You're trying to deallocate the character-string literal "Hello". This line:

buf = "Hello";

redirects the pointer buf to point at the literal "Hello". You probably meant to do this:

char *buf = new char[6]; //need one extra space for terminating NUL character
strcpy(buf, "Hello");
share|improve this answer
 char *buf  = new char[6];   //pre-allocated buffer
 strncpy(buf, "hello", 6);
 delete [] buf;

buf = "hello"; would change the buf's value, from a pointer to new char[6] To a pointer point to "hello", a block of memory not in heap.

share|improve this answer
    
strncpy is a bug. – melpomene Nov 29 '12 at 13:37
    
1. It pretends to be a string function when it has nothing to do with strings. 2. It abstracts behavior that shouldn't be abstracted in the first place. Issues 1+2 lead to people using it inappropriately (because there is no appropriate use for it). E.g. in the code above buf[5] was originally left uninitialized. – melpomene Nov 29 '12 at 13:43
    
@melpomene: I'll somewhat agree it doesn't do anything that couldn't have been done by memcpy or memmove plus memset. (Biggest difference being, it zero-pads the destination to the size you pass in; hence the memset.) In its defense, though, it was meant as (and is) just a safer version of strcpy. I'd argue that naked char arrays should never have been given special status as strings at all; a string should be a char* and a length, or an array should be able to know its size. – cHao Nov 29 '12 at 13:49
    
It was not meant as a safer version of strcpy. It is not a safer version of strcpy. It is not a string function at all. – melpomene Nov 29 '12 at 13:51
    
@melpomene: You're being overly dramatic. There are a few select cases where C strings are conceivable in C++. – netcoder Nov 29 '12 at 13:51

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