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All,

Can anybody provide advice on how to use the JAAS LoginContext to do an authentication against multiple KDC/Realm combination. In other words, if attempt 1 fails against realm A, try realm B.

Something like the pseudo-code below.

As always, any help is greatly appreciated.

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[realms]   
  some.address.for.auth.one  
  {  
     kdc = some.address.one  
  }  

  some.address.for.auth.two  
  {  
     kdc = some.address.two  
  }  

boolean loginSuccess = false;  

try  
{  
   LoginContext lc = new LoginContext(...);  
   //Try Realm 1  
   lc.login();  
   loginSuccess = true;  
}  
catch(LoginException le)  
{  
  try  
  {  
     LoginContext lc2 = new LoginContext(...);  
     //Try Realm 2  
     lc2.login();  
     loginSuccess = true;  
  }  
  catch(LoginException le)  
  {  
     //...  
  }  
}  

return loginSuccess;  
share|improve this question
    
Did you actually try your code? –  Michael-O Nov 29 '12 at 14:58
    
You mean the pseudo code above? No, but I've ran several variations. I may not fully understand, but it looks like the krb plugin uses either System.setProperty(..), which will break things if there are two instances or if pointed at the krb5.conf file it only attempts to auth to the default realm. –  ussmith Nov 29 '12 at 19:32
    
You cannot authenticate to multiple realms directly because your keytab is bound to one realm. You can though request a TGT for a different realm from your realm. So there is no need to create to login contexts. –  Michael-O Nov 29 '12 at 22:22

1 Answer 1

It's possible. For example you could have each configuration in separate files and then at the beginning of each try pass Java paths to krb5.ini and login.conf files:

boolean loginSuccess = false;  

try  
{  
   System.setProperty("java.security.krb5.conf", "C:\kerb\conf1\krb5.ini");
   System.setProperty("java.security.auth.login.config", "C:\kerb\conf1\login.conf");
   // in login.conf you can have defined path to keytab for this configuration

   LoginContext lc = new LoginContext(...);  
   //Try Realm 1  
   lc.login();  
   loginSuccess = true;  
}  
catch(LoginException le)  
{  
  try  
  {  
     System.setProperty("java.security.krb5.conf", "C:\kerb\conf2\krb5.ini");
     System.setProperty("java.security.auth.login.config", "C:\kerb\conf2\login.conf");
     // in login.conf you can have defined path to keytab for this configuration

     LoginContext lc2 = new LoginContext(...);  
     //Try Realm 2  
     lc2.login();  
     loginSuccess = true;  
  }  
  catch(LoginException le)  
  {  
     //...  
  }  
}  

return loginSuccess;  

Those two system properties are described here: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/technotes/guides/security/jgss/tutorials/LoginConfigFile.html and http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/technotes/guides/security/jgss/tutorials/KerberosReq.html

Another possibility could be configuration without files. There's a LoginContext constructor which takes CallbackHandler (here you pass username and password), and Configuration (here you pass parameters which you have in login.conf). Kdc and realm can be passed in System properties java.security.krb5.realm and java.security.krb5.kdc

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/javax/security/auth/login/LoginContext.html#LoginContext-java.lang.String-javax.security.auth.Subject-javax.security.auth.callback.CallbackHandler-javax.security.auth.login.Configuration-

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