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I have a menu div which has a dark background. Inside it, I have several menu item divs with 1px margins on the right and the left. This way I've got separators between them. Obviously these appear on the very left and very right side of the menu which I don't want. Is there a way to accomplish this without inserting 1-pixel divs as separators?

Thank you

edit: sorry, I thought it was descriptive enough. Here is the code:

<div id="menu">
       <a href="#"><div class="menu_item"><img src="imgs/menu/szabalyzat.png" /></div></a>
       <a href="#"><div class="menu_item"><img src="imgs/menu/profil.png" /></div></a>
       <a href="#"><div class="menu_item"><img src="imgs/menu/zenekarok.png" /></div></a>
       <a href="#"><div class="menu_item"><img src="imgs/menu/jelentkezes.png" /></div></a>
       <a href="#"><div class="menu_item"><img src="imgs/menu/esemenynaptar.png" /></div></a>
       <a href="#"><div class="menu_item"><img src="imgs/menu/mmmk_estek.png" /></div></a>
 </div>

IE6 incompatibility is OK (thankfully).

share|improve this question
    
showing us some code would be nice, as we can only assume what you mean have so far. –  Jakub Sep 1 '09 at 14:16
    
putting divs inside links is not good. –  n1313 Sep 1 '09 at 14:37
    
n1313: If I don't, only the images are clickable and they are smaller than the actual divs. –  Tamás Szelei Sep 1 '09 at 14:47
    
By positioning the links appropriately, you shouldn't need the divs. something like: .menu a { display: block; width: 100px; float: left; } –  Allain Lalonde Sep 1 '09 at 14:56
    
You have to put an alt attribute to your images, so some text shows up if images can't be loaded or displayed, if you don't your menu won't be usable in this case. (+ it's mandatory to be standard compliant). –  p4bl0 Sep 1 '09 at 15:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Can't you have 2px left-margin instead of 1px on each side and then use the css pseudo class :first-child to remove these margin for the first item ?

EDIT: I agree with the fact that you should use border as separator rather than background but in case you do this that way for some good reasons, my answer's still valid :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Well, I'm inexperienced with CSS, and didn't think of borders for this purpose. I had the #menu div and this was the firs solution that came into my mind. Do borders have some advantage over this solution? –  Tamás Szelei Sep 1 '09 at 14:37
    
borders are just a more "clean" way of doing this, since a border is already a kind of separator. –  p4bl0 Sep 1 '09 at 15:10

The following rule will apply to all .menu_item elements that follow another .menu_item element:

.menu_item + .menu_item {
  border-left: 2px solid black;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
hey! more pretty than my :first-child way! –  p4bl0 Sep 1 '09 at 14:20
2  
Sadly, does not work in ie6 though. –  Joel Potter Sep 1 '09 at 14:21
1  
Doesn anyone still use IE6? jk –  Allain Lalonde Sep 1 '09 at 14:25
1  
15% of your customers do. –  n1313 Sep 1 '09 at 14:26
2  
It won't work in IE... So what? That's not something really important, it's just a small design polishing. As long as the website is usable with every browser it's okay for me. It's not a 20 by 2 px black rectangle that will scare IE6 users... If that was the case most of them would already be dead by heart-attack ^^. –  p4bl0 Sep 1 '09 at 15:15

The simplest way yo achieve it is to mark your first and last elements with custom classes and remove that margins from them.

<ul class="menu">
  <li class="first">One</li>
  <li>Two</li>
  <li>Three</li>
  <li class="last">Four</li>
</ul>
<style>
  .menu li { margin: 0 1px; }
  .menu .first { margin-left: 0; }
  .menu .last { margin-right: 0; }
</style>

You can also try using complex css selectors, like :first-child, but they do not work in older versions of MSIE.

OR, you can use 2px margins on the right side instead and go with only one additional class:

<ul class="menu">
  <li>One</li>
  <li>Two</li>
  <li>Three</li>
  <li class="last">Four</li>
</ul>
<style>
  .menu li { margin-right: 2px; }
  .menu .last { margin-right: 0; }
</style>
share|improve this answer
    
I corrected the margin in the first example, 1px 0 puts the margin on the top/bottom, not left/right as it should be. Also "none" is not a valid value AFAIK so I replaced with 0. –  DisgruntledGoat Sep 1 '09 at 14:29
    
Whoops, my bad. Thanks. –  n1313 Sep 1 '09 at 14:36

If a high percentage of your audience's browsers support CSS3, you can use the :first-child and :last-child pseudo-classes:

div#menu div:first-child {
margin-left: none;
}
div#menu div:last-child {
margin-right: none;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think first and last-child are actually CSS2. Most browser support them, I think only ie6 does not (again). –  Joel Potter Sep 1 '09 at 16:56

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