Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We can raise event in two ways:

public event EventHandler MyEvent;

private void DoSomething()
{
    ...
    var handler = MyEvent;
    if (handler != null)
        handler(this,EventArgs.Empty);
}

and

public event EventHandler MyEvent = (o,e) => {} ;

private void DoSomething()
{
    ...
    MyEvent(this, EventArgs.Empty);
}

I prefer the last one. It is shorter.
My colleagues insist on the first variant.

Is there any superiority of the first over the second one?

share|improve this question
    
You can at least simplify the first to if (this.MyEvent != null) this.MyEvent(this, EventArgs.Empty); –  Jon B Nov 29 '12 at 15:28
5  
@JonB: Wrong; that isn't thread-safe. –  SLaks Nov 29 '12 at 15:29
3  
how are you going to prevent the class from setting the event to null? –  Erno de Weerd Nov 29 '12 at 15:29
1  
@Jon no, you shouldn't. That can cause a race condition, see Eric Lippert's blog –  default.kramer Nov 29 '12 at 15:30
1  
If some code sets the event to null, the second variant raises null exceptions. –  namehere Nov 29 '12 at 15:36
show 7 more comments

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Eric Lippert has a great blog post on Events and Races, which you should read if you haven't.

The first option could be considered safer than the second because the event could get set to null. Someone could carelessly modify the class. Also, if you deserialize instances the 2nd method won't work (depending on the serialization mechanism you use).

I sometimes use a helper method to raise events

static class Raiser
{
    public static void Raise<T>(this EventHandler<T> evnt, object sender, T args)
        where T : EventArgs
    {
        if (evnt != null)
        {
            evnt(sender, args);
        }
    }
}

class SomeClass
{
    public event EventHandler<EventArgs> MyEvent;

    private void DoSomething()
    {
        MyEvent.Raise(this, EventArgs.Empty);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Best of both worlds and a good use of extenstion methods, gets my orange arrow. –  Paolo Nov 29 '12 at 15:42
    
Nice helper method. Thanks! –  voroninp Nov 29 '12 at 15:46
    
I agree with your arguments but I interested about 'careless modification'. Does it mean I should check ANY variable in a method which can accidentally be changed somewhere else in the code? I thought it was Code Contracts' invariants for such a purpose. –  voroninp Nov 29 '12 at 17:16
1  
Well, I wouldn't consider careless modification a reason to favor option 1 over option 2, but your colleagues might :) –  default.kramer Nov 29 '12 at 17:39
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.