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My question is... in CallMeLaterTestObj function in the TestObj the "this" is the window object and not TestObj. How can I restructure this so that within the CallMeLater function I don't have to wrap the call function() { v.CallMeLaterTestObj(); } in a closure or using the bind function since it has limited support to newer browsers. Two objectives:

  • Keeping "this" in function calls within the object
  • Maintaining a separate value for "value" for each separate object so they don't share the same value.

    // Emulating public api, private methods, private variables, public fields.

    // New portion of question

  • Re-written to include binding function and prototypical notation. How do you move the Binding function into a base object that all new objects would get?

  • This is as close as I can come to getting this to use the best of both worlds. I have no idea what the pitfalls of this approach are though

        var BaseObject = function ()
        {
            _getBinding = function (method)
            {
                var _self = this;
                return function ()
                {
                    _self[method].apply(_self, arguments);
                };
            };
            return {
                CallInline: _getBinding
            }
        }();
    
    
        var TestObj = function (value)
            {
                $.extend(this, BaseObject);
                // public var
                this._value = value;
            };
    
        TestObj.prototype = function()
        {
            var privateVar = false;
            // these are private
            _giveMe = function () {
                return this._value;
            },
            _callMeLaterTestObj = function () {
                console.log('I am ' + this.constructor.name + ' my value is ' + this._value);
            };
    
            // public API
            return {
                GiveMe : _giveMe,
                CallMeLaterTestObj : _callMeLaterTestObj
            }
    
        }();
    
        function CallMeLater(v, i)
        {
            setTimeout(v.CallInline('CallMeLaterTestObj'), 10);
        }
    
    
    
        var V1 = new TestObj(1);
        var V2 = new TestObj(2);
        var V3 = new TestObj(3);
    
    
        console.log('V1= ' + V1.GiveMe());
        console.log('V2= ' + V2.GiveMe());
        console.log('V3= ' + V3.GiveMe());
        console.log('---');
    
        V1.CallMeLaterTestObj();
    
        console.log('---');
    
share|improve this question
    
A constructor should not return an object –  Juan Mendes Nov 29 '12 at 15:32
    
How could this be restructured using the Revealing Prototype Pattern? That would give me a separate constructor and also the ability to provide an API? –  denas Nov 29 '12 at 15:35
    
@JuanMendes Constructor no longer returns an object but "this" is lost in CallMeLaters call to v.CallMeLaterTestObj. Any way around this besides the two commented out lines in CallMeLater –  denas Nov 29 '12 at 16:11
1  
Private vars make hardly any sense for constructor functions - they would be static at least. –  Bergi Nov 29 '12 at 16:26
    
@JuanMendes you keep editing my post, but not providing answers... it's not helping –  denas Nov 29 '12 at 17:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think what you're looking for is this:

function TestObj(value) {
    var _value = value;

    this.giveMe = function() {
        return _value;
    };

    this.callMeLaterTestObj = function() {
        console.log('I am ' + this.constructor.name + ' my value is ' + _value);
    };

    return this;
};

function callMeLater(v, i) {
    setTimeout(function() {
        v.callMeLaterTestObj();
    }, 10);    
}

var v1 = new TestObj(1);
var v2 = new TestObj(2);
var v3 = new TestObj(3);

console.log('V1= ' + v1.giveMe());
console.log('V2= ' + v2.giveMe());
console.log('V3= ' + v3.giveMe());
console.log('---');

callMeLater(v1, 1);
callMeLater(v2, 2);
callMeLater(v3, 3);​

To access constructor.name, you need to declare the function with function name() syntax, rather than var name = function() syntax.

To keep private variables and expose a public api, expose the public variables as properties of this in the function.

Be sure to return this from the constructor function to make it work.

It's also good practice to follow the naming convention of CamelCase for class names (of which TestObj is one) and lowerCamelCase for variables / methods / objects / etc. Helps keep things clear as to which variables are instances, and which are Classes.

Test and see the console output expected here.

note

Regarding wrapping v.callMeLaterTestObj() in a closure for the setTimeout, this technique is completely cross-browser compatible. You won't have any issues.

The bind method is newer, although there are many libraries that will shim that for you in older browsers. My personal favourite is underscore.

note 2

You can't call a method on an object in setTimeout without wrapping it in a closure somewhere, however if you want to you can abstract the closure in the Class without using a generic bind function (as provided by Underscore or jQuery and others) you can 'roll your own' in the Class like this:

function TestObj(value) {

    var _value = value;
    var _self = this;

    this.giveMe = function() {
        return _value;
    };

    this.callMeLaterTestObj = function() {
        console.log('I am ' + this.constructor.name + ' my value is ' + _value);
    };

    this.getBinding = function(method) {
        var _self = this;
        return function() {
            _self[method].apply(_self, arguments);
        };
    };

    return this;
};

function callMeLater(v, i) {
    setTimeout(v.getBinding('callMeLaterTestObj'), 10);    
}

var v1 = new TestObj(1);
var v2 = new TestObj(2);
var v3 = new TestObj(3);

console.log('V1= ' + v1.giveMe());
console.log('V2= ' + v2.giveMe());
console.log('V3= ' + v3.giveMe());
console.log('---');

callMeLater(v1, 1);
callMeLater(v2, 2);
callMeLater(v3, 3);​

explanation:

You need to use some sort of binding because, when you pass the method to setTimeout, you pass it by reference. So all setTimeout sees is a function - not the object it was on, which is why you lose the context of this.

Since setTimeout will therefore execute the function in the default scope - i.e. the browser window - you need a way to get this back, by reference, either through an inline anonymous function, or by returning a closure that uses the apply method to 'reset' this.

note 3

If you wanted to have your own bind method, and not include a library that provides it for you or include it in every class then you can use this one from Underscore, which defers to the native method in newer browsers:

function bind(func, context) {
  var bound, args;
  if (func.bind === nativeBind && nativeBind) return nativeBind.apply(func, slice.call(arguments, 1));
  if (!_.isFunction(func)) throw new TypeError;
  args = slice.call(arguments, 2);
  return bound = function() {
    if (!(this instanceof bound)) return func.apply(context, args.concat(slice.call(arguments)));
    ctor.prototype = func.prototype;
    var self = new ctor;
    var result = func.apply(self, args.concat(slice.call(arguments)));
    if (Object(result) === result) return result;
    return self;
  };
};

Then use it like this:

function callMeLater(v, i) {
    setTimeout(bind(v.callMeLaterTestObj, v), 10);    
}

This will work well in all browsers.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to avoid writing function() { v.callMeLaterTestObj(); } every time... that's the problem –  denas Nov 29 '12 at 16:44
    
I've updated my answer to include more information; it provides a public api to a private variable, and lets you short-cut the creation of inline functions. If that's not what you're after, could you explain exactly why you're trying to avoid closures? –  Jed Watson Nov 29 '12 at 16:58
    
is every time this creates an object it's creating copies of the functions giveme and callmelater because they are part of the constructor? –  denas Nov 29 '12 at 17:06
    
also, wouldn't I have to include that get binding function on every object? –  denas Nov 29 '12 at 17:19
    
yes - that's how those functions retain the reference to the local _value variable that's also created in the constructor. You could put the giveMe and callMeLater methods on the TestObj.prototype, but then you'd have to store the value property on this, which would expose it publicly and wouldn't give you the private variable / public api separation you wanted. –  Jed Watson Nov 29 '12 at 17:20

No, you can't. That's just the way to do it. Btw, you can easily shim the bind method so that it is available in older browsers, too.

An alternative would be to move the closure into the prototype method, if you know that you always will need to bind the actual function:

TestObj.prototype.getCallMeLaterTestObj = function () {
    var that = this;
    return function() {
        console.log('I am ' + that.constructor.name + ' my value is ' + that._value);
    };
};
setTimeout(v.getCallMeLaterTestObj(), 10);

Btw, your prototype has no constructor property so the log will not work as expected.

Your only chance is to avoid the this keyword entirely:

TestObj = function() {
    var privateVar = false; // these are private static
    function TestObj(value) {
        function giveMe() {
            return value;
        }
        function callMeLaterTestObj() {
            console.log('I am TestObj my value is ' + giveMe());
        }
        this._value = value;
        this.giveMe = giveMe;
        this.callMeLaterTestObj = callMeLaterTestObj;
        /* you could do this as well:
        return {
           _value: value,
           giveMe: giveMe,
           callMeLaterTestObj: callMeLaterTestObj
        }; */
    }
    return TestObj;
})();
var v = new TestObj;
setTimeout(v.callMeLater, 10);

But this is not very memory-efficient, as it does not use prototypical inheritance at all.

share|improve this answer
    
If I shim the bind method, is there a way to include it in the above code as part of the class so that it doesn't have to explicitly be called in CallMeLater on the v.CallMeLaterTestObj.bind(v) –  denas Nov 29 '12 at 16:19
    
No. Wherever you use the this keyword, you'll need to bind the function from outside. –  Bergi Nov 29 '12 at 16:25
    
@Bergi It has a constructor: Function, so that last line is incorrect. –  Asad Nov 29 '12 at 16:26
    
Yeah I'm trying to find teh best way to marry the two approaches together without loosing "this" and without using function enclosures all over. The concept of moving the enclosure into the class function as you had it seems interesting –  denas Nov 29 '12 at 16:33
    
@Asad: Oh, right, it still inherits from Object.prototype. Yet that one's "constructor" is Object, not Function. –  Bergi Nov 29 '12 at 16:34

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