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It's my understanding that all three of these lines below should return an ARRAY with 2 results in it. Yet RegExp will only return 1 result no matter how many times the regex repeats in the string.

Can some one explain why? And perhaps suggest how I can get RegExp to give me global results?

//INTPUT: 
    console.log(new RegExp("New York", "gi").exec("New York New York")); 

//OUTPUT: 
["New York"]

//INTPUT: 
    console.log(new RegExp(/New York/gi).exec("New York New York"));

//OUTPUT: 
["New York"]

//INTPUT: 
    console.log("New York New York".match(/New York/gi));

//OUTPUT:
["New York", "New York"]
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2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

your third example is the best way to get the array of matches.

RegExp.exec actually remembers its position, and returns the next result on subsequent calls:

>>> var v = /new york/gi
>>> v.exec("NEW YORK new york")
["NEW YORK"]
>>> v.exec("NEW YORK new york")
["new york"]
>>> v.exec("NEW YORK new york")
null
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you could leverage this to build an aray yourself, but it's easier to just call string.match –  Rob Fonseca-Ensor Sep 1 '09 at 15:07
    
I have an array of keywords that I'm trying to get a count of the number of occurrences in a string. what's the best way to do that? –  STHayden Sep 1 '09 at 17:15
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This is expected, exec() returns a single match but provides more info about the match than match(). If you just want all the matches, use match(). From JavaScript: The Definitive Guide:

Recall that match() returns an array of matches when passed a global regular expresion. exec(), by contrast, always returns a single match and provides complete information about that match. When exec() is called on a regular epression that has the g flag, it sets the lastIndex property of the matched substring. When exec() is invoked a second time for the same regular expression, it begins its search at the character position indicated by the lastIndex property.

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