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I am very new to localization, I am trying to localize a small software which has 19 folders 'en', 'jp, 'tw' as names for example. Inside each one is a text file saved as utf-8 with language data.

The problem is when I try and copy and paste from a chinese site I get strange glyphs like this [][][][] I presume its because my system font is not chinese and it does not support that.

As a developer should I somehow change my entire system font to have all of these languages supported? Is there such a font? I am unsure how software companies handle these things.

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You need to know how the text is encoded, although it is likely that it would be utf-8, it could be any codepage, utf-8 and utf-16 normally have a BOM in text files to indicate if it is unicode. Also simply changing the system font just changes how characters are displayed it does not tell you that the text will display correctly. You should convert code page encoded text to wide char based string, then you select a font that can display those characters. –  EdChum Nov 29 '12 at 15:42
    
There is no font that is universal as far as I am aware for all languages especially covering all Chinese, Korean, and Japanese characters, for Chinese you have simplified and traditional just to add to the headache, variants of arabic, south east asian languages...There is no such font to the best of my knowledge, in Windows in fonts control panel, there is a column saying 'Designed for' this will tell you if that font is suitable for a given character set –  EdChum Nov 29 '12 at 15:44
    
So should I leave the text as [][][][][] in my notepad++ edited file? and that should work inside the software itself? which uses opengl texture glyphs as far as I am aware. –  Kachinsky Nov 29 '12 at 15:50
    
what has been copied into notepad++ sounds like some ansi encoded text, if you change the encoding (Encoding > Character Sets > Chinese > Big5 (Traditional) or GB2312 (Simplified) it will probably suddenly display correctly unless the font that notepad++ is using cannot display those characters, when I say correctly you still need to know what the encoding is, entirely possible for text encoded in traditional Chinese to display 'correctly' to non-Chinese user if you incorrectly select simplified Chinese –  EdChum Nov 29 '12 at 15:55

1 Answer 1

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As a developer should I somehow change my entire system font to have all of these languages supported?

No, you should not. Consider localization string as data.

The problem is when I try and copy and paste from a chinese site I get strange glyphs like this [][][][] I presume its because my system font is not chinese and it does not support that.

But you should be provided with such data and you should know it's encoding.

Also, I've suggest you to check internationalization libraries (like gettext) to prevent reinventing the wheel.

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