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Given a matrix A, I need to find the indices corresponding to the values 1 and 2. I could do this sequentially as follows:

>> B

B =

     1     2     3
     4     1     6
     7     8     9
     4     5     1

>> find(B==1)

ans =

     1
     6
    12

>> find(B==2)

ans =

     5

But if I do this kind of operation in a loop, Matlab will only use one core of my processor. How can I vectorise it, so that I obtain a matrix from find? I want this result:

>> my_find( B, [1 2] )

ans =

    1 5
    6 0
   12 0

(or some other padding)

How can I obtain this?

share|improve this question
    
How flexible are you with your data format? If a cell array is ok, you could try arrayfun(@(x) find(B==x), [1 2], 'UniformOutput', false) –  mars Nov 29 '12 at 16:05
    
@mars Thanks! I suppose I can figure out how to obtain the matrix from there. –  Andreas Nov 29 '12 at 16:07
2  
Using find will not make MATLAB use more CPU cores - here is a list of internal functions that can benefit from parallelism. So you might as well use a loop. –  angainor Nov 29 '12 at 16:07
1  
Why does find(B==1 | B==2) not suffice? Or even, if your application allows it, skip the find and just use logical indices: B==1 | B==2. Sadly I don't think this will be done in parallel...you'll have to write your own MEX file for that I'm afraid. –  Rody Oldenhuis Nov 29 '12 at 16:32
2  
Also, I assume you've got some bigger matrices to compare? Because the overhead of starting two threads would probably make this slower than the single-threaded version for matrices this small... –  Rody Oldenhuis Nov 29 '12 at 16:39

2 Answers 2

Just don't use find

B==1

ans =

 1     0     0
 0     1     0
 0     0     0
 0     0     1

B==2

ans =

 0     1     0
 0     0     0
 0     0     0
 0     0     0

And then add or logical OR those together.

i.e.

(B==1) + (B==2)

ans =

 1     1     0
 0     1     0
 0     0     0
 0     0     1

or

(B==1) | (B==2)

ans =

 1     1     0
 0     1     0
 0     0     0
 0     0     1
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, Although I would recommend to use & instead of + so that the data type remains logical. –  mythealias Nov 29 '12 at 19:24
    
good suggestion, +1 –  Will Faithfull Nov 29 '12 at 19:46
    
actually would need be a logical or | in this case –  Will Faithfull Nov 29 '12 at 20:14
    
yes that is correct. I had earlier written & or | to emphasize on logical operation, but while editing removed the wrong one :) –  mythealias Nov 29 '12 at 22:12

[i, j] = ind2sub(size(B), find(logical(sum(bsxfun(@eq, B(:), [1 2]), 2))))

share|improve this answer
    
With this, I don't think it's possible to discern which ones matched 1 and which ones matched 2. –  Andreas Nov 29 '12 at 15:57
    
Sure it is; just split it up into more than one line: Bprime = B(:); inds = find(logical(sum(bsxfun(@eq, Bprime, [1 2]), 2))); Bprime(inds) will give you the value that matched each returned index in inds. –  wakjah Nov 29 '12 at 16:06
    
And then it isn't vectorised... –  Andreas Nov 29 '12 at 16:07

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