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I want to declare a typeclass that has some implemented functions which utilize an unimplemented constant value (table):

class FromRow a => StdQueries a where
  table :: String
  byId :: Int -> QueryM (Maybe a)
  byId = fmap listToMaybe . queryM sql . Only
    where sql = read $ "SELECT * FROM " ++ table ++ " WHERE id = ?"

The idea is simple: I want to get the byId (and other similar functions) available by instantiating this typeclass by specifying just the table:

instance StdQueries SomeType where
  table = "the_constant_value_for_this_type"

But the compiler keeps complaining with the following message:

The class method `table'
mentions none of the type variables of the class StdQueries a
When checking the class method: table :: String
In the class declaration for `StdQueries'

Are there any solutions to that kind of a problem? Can tricking with newtype help or anything like that?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The simplest thing you can do is

class FromRow a => StdQueries a where
    byId :: Int -> QueryM (Maybe a)

defaultById :: FromRow a => String -> Int -> QueryM (Maybe a)
defaultById table = fmap listToMaybe . queryM sql . Only
    where sql = read $ "SELECT * FROM " ++ table ++ " WHERE id = ?"

instance StdQueries SomeType where
    byId = defaultById "the_constant_value_for_this_type"

This is simple, but if you have more than one function that needs access to the table value, you have to specify that value more than once.

You can avoid that, and sabauma's need for undefined and {-# LANGUAGE ScopedTypeVariables #-} like this:

newtype Table a = Table String

class FromRow a => StdQueries a where
    table :: Table a
    byId :: Int -> QueryM (Maybe a)
    byId = defaultById table

defaultById :: StdQueries a => Table a -> Int -> QueryM (Maybe a)
defaultById (Table table) = fmap listToMaybe . queryM sql . Only
    where sql = read $ "SELECT * FROM " ++ table ++ " WHERE id = ?"

instance StdQueries SomeType where
    table = Table "the_constant_value_for_this_type"

The magic here is the type signature for defaultById, which forces byId to provide the table from the same instance. If we provided defaultById :: (StdQueries a, StdQueries b) => Table a -> Int -> QueryM (Maybe b) then defaultById would still compile, but we would still get a similar error message to the one in your question: the compiler would no longer know which definition of table to use.

By making Table a a data structure instead of a newtype wrapper, you can extend this to specify many fields in the constant, if required.

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The issue is that the definition of table does not mention any of the type variables of the class, so there would not be any way to figure out which version of table to use. A (admittedly hackish) solution might be something like:

{-# LANGUAGE ScopedTypeVariables #-}
class FromRow a => StdQueries a where
  table :: a -> String
  byId :: Int -> QueryM (Maybe a)
  byId = fmap listToMaybe . queryM sql . Only
    where sql = read $ "SELECT * FROM " ++ table (undefined :: a) ++ " WHERE id = ?"

instance StdQueries SomeType where
    table = const "the_constant_value_for_this_type"

Which you could then use via

table (undefined :: SomeType) == "the_constant_value_for_this_type"

Not that I would really recommend doing this.

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2  
There's not much wrong with this, lots of type classes do it this way. –  leftaroundabout Nov 29 '12 at 16:10
    
please format your code to make it more readable; also, does this really work? it looks like you are making table a function now, but you're not using it that way in the where sql = ... part. –  user5402 Nov 29 '12 at 16:10
    
type of table is a -> String and not String so how are you concatenating it ? –  Satvik Nov 29 '12 at 16:12
    
you should do table (undefined :: a) and use extension ScopedTypeVariables –  Satvik Nov 29 '12 at 16:13
1  
@sabauma: If you really want to, you can go via data Proxy a = Proxy, which gives you table :: Proxy a -> String and table (Proxy :: Proxy SomeType). A bit more verbose, but much safer. –  Vitus Nov 29 '12 at 17:46

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