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I'm learning C# and currently we're looking into OOP concepts. We've been given this question and I'm struggling to understand some parts of it.

The gist of the question is this.

Define a class named Operator.

That class should implement following methods.

  • IsPositive - Receives an integer type value and returns true if it is positive, false otherwise.
  • IsDayOfWeek - Receives a date time value and a week day name (E.g. Saturday) and returns true if the value represents the given week day name, false otherwise.
  • GetWords - Receives a text containing words (say paragraphs) and returns a single dimension string array with all words. An empty string array if there is no word available in the text.

It should be able to derive from Operator class and then create objects from the derived class.

Developers are allowed to use these methods from derived class for a given type. In other words, 1st method could be used when type = ‘N’ (number), 2nd methods could be used when type is ‘D’ (date) and 3rd method could be used when type is ‘S’ (string) given. Hence, the type should be provided when instantiating the object and it should be available throughout the class operations.

I have sufficient knowledge to write the methods but what I don't understand is the part I have bold-ed. What does it mean by some method can be used when some type is given and the type should be provided when instantiating the object and it should be available throughout the class? Are they talking about Properties?

I have given it a go. Below is my code.

public class Operator
    {
        private int _n;
        private DateTime _d;
        private string _s;

        public DataProcessor(int n, DateTime d, string s)
        {
            this.N = n;
            this.D = d;
            this.S = s;
        }


        public int N
        {
            set { _n = value; }
        }

        public DateTime D
        {
            set { _d = value; }
        }

        public string S
        {
            set { _s = value; }
        }


        public bool IsPositive()
        {
            //method code goes here
            return false;
        }

        public bool IsDayOfWeek()
        {
            //method code goes here
            return false;
        }

    }

I'm not sure if I'm going the right way. Can somebody please shed some light on this?

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Were your instructions originally written in English? Because I am a native speaker and I am struggling to understand them too. "Type" has a very specific meaning in programming languages, but I don't think the instructions are using that meaning. –  ShellShock Nov 29 '12 at 16:18
    
The bold part does not make sense –  Massimiliano Peluso Nov 29 '12 at 16:19
    
I can understand very well if you think the problem they gave you is hard to understand. When I read about IsPositive, I'm thinking something like public bool IsPositive(int value) { return value > 0; } but then when I read the bold part, it almost sounds like the class holds a generic type, as in class Operator<TType>, but I can't make much sense of it. Who wrote this problem? –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Nov 29 '12 at 16:21
    
@ShellShock Yes, this is exactly how its printed in the given paper. –  Solitaire Nov 29 '12 at 16:24
1  
I'm thinking the bold text is describing generics but I have an issue with It should be able to derive from Operator class and then create objects from the derived class; It seems to be referring to the class you're defining which would be Operator, so how could Operator derive from Operator? –  vane Nov 29 '12 at 16:25
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1 Answer

This is how I read it:

public class Operator
{
    public char TypeChar { get; set; }

    public Operator(char operatorType) { this.TypeChar = operatorType; }

    public bool IsPositive(int N)
    {
        if (TypeChar != 'N')
           throw new Exception("Cannot call this method for this type of Operator");

    // method implementation code
    }

    // same for the other methods
}

public NumericOperator : Operator
{
    public NumericOperator() : base('N') {}
}
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