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if we have these statements:

String S1 = "AAA";
S1 = "aaa";

this mean that the original value assigned to a specific property has't changed.(because the string class is immutable and S1 is an interned object).

now... if we have the following statements:

String S1 = new String("AAA");
S1="aaa";

this mean that the original value assigned to a specific property in string class has changed.(because the string class is immutable and S1 is not interned object)

is my understanding right?

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1  
Easy to try and see S1 does not change in either case. –  madth3 Nov 29 '12 at 16:34

3 Answers 3

No, String object is immutable under any circumstances. When you call new String("foo") this simply creates another one string with content of passed. So don't do this.

EDIT:
In the second case S1 isn't interned but this doesn't cancel its immutability. So String assignment always doesn't change left object but simply rewrites reference.

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Sorry for mistake... please read the post again... –  user1735329 Nov 29 '12 at 16:43
    
now which one will modify original value. –  user1735329 Nov 29 '12 at 16:45
    
The only thing that changes is that S1 points to a different String object. You have not, and cannot, modify the String itself. –  Louis Wasserman Nov 29 '12 at 17:07

Adding to other answers,

String constructor that takes String object is a design flaw(It doesn't make sense to create an immutable instance twice) and is deprecated. Don't use it.

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Strings are immutable. That means that an instance of String cannot change. You're creating new variable to refer to a different but still immutable String instance.

it allows for changes to the string to branch off the original string in a change list sort of method

String s = new String();

An empty String object ("") is created. And the variable s refers to that object.

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