Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would simply like to create a numpy array of size(N,m) that has just the first column made of integer, and the rest by default float. So that, if initialized to zero it should be results:

array([[ 0,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0,  0.,  0.,  0.,  0.]])

All the attempts I have made return me some tuple sub-elements when trying to create such a structured array.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You could use an array with dtype = object:

>>> arr = np.ndarray((10,4),dtype = object)
>>> arr[:,0] = int(10)
>>> arr[:,1:] = float(10)
>>> arr
array([[10, 10.0, 10.0, 10.0],
       [10, 10.0, 10.0, 10.0],
       [10, 10.0, 10.0, 10.0],
       [10, 10.0, 10.0, 10.0],
       [10, 10.0, 10.0, 10.0],
       [10, 10.0, 10.0, 10.0],
       [10, 10.0, 10.0, 10.0],
       [10, 10.0, 10.0, 10.0],
       [10, 10.0, 10.0, 10.0],
       [10, 10.0, 10.0, 10.0]], dtype=object)

Notice that you get the right behavior when doing arithmetic.

>>> arr / 3
array([[3, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333],
       [3, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333],
       [3, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333],
       [3, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333],
       [3, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333],
       [3, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333],
       [3, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333],
       [3, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333],
       [3, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333],
       [3, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333, 3.33333333333]], dtype=object)

Or you could use a numpy.recarray:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> arr = np.recarray(10,dtype=[('x',int),('y',float,4)])
>>> arr[:] = 0
>>> arr
rec.array([(0, array([ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.])), (0, array([ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.])),
           (0, array([ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.])), (0, array([ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.])),
           (0, array([ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.])), (0, array([ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.])),
           (0, array([ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.])), (0, array([ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.])),
           (0, array([ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.])), (0, array([ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.]))], 
  dtype=[('x', '<i4'), ('y', '<f8', (4,))])
>>> arr['x']
array([0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])
>>> arr['y']
array([[ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.]])

If you need to do arithmetic on all the values, you'll have to perform the operation on each field seperately, e.g.

>>> arr['x'] += 2
>>> arr['y'] += 2
share|improve this answer

Although I can think of lots of reasons why you shouldn't be wanting to do this in the first place, it's not for me to judge, and I hate when people try to diminish the value of my own quick'n'dirty hacks.

The rationale is to use dtype=object. Since everything in Python is an object, you can mixed numeric types while still preserving homogeneity inside an array. I suggest the following, but you can obviously adapt to your needs:

import numpy

rows = 5
a = numpy.zeros((rows,5)).astype(object)
a[:,0] = a[:,0].astype(int)
print a

[[0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0]
 [0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0]
 [0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0]
 [0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0]
 [0  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0]]
share|improve this answer

Read this in the numpy documentation, which indicates all the members have to be of same type

NumPy's main object is the homogeneous multidimensional array. It is a table of elements (usually numbers), all of the same type, indexed by a tuple of positive integers.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.