Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In C#, I can build resx files for various languages/cultures using the standing ISO naming convention (i.e., Strings.resx, Strings.en-GB.resx, Strings.fr.resx). When I compile, I get a corresponding folders for each of the culture-specific resx files. My dilemma is with the naming convention used.

MS uses "the format languagecode2-country/regioncode2, where languagecode2 is a lowercase two-letter code derived from ISO 639-1 and country/regioncode2 is an uppercase two-letter code derived from ISO 3166."

Because of some interactions with other components in my company that I have little control over, I need use an underscore (_), like this: languagecode2_country/regioncode2. For example, instead of "en-GB", I need "en_GB". The goal is to get my app to look for the resource file in a folder named en_GB whenever the culture on system is set to "en-GB".

Is this possible? I haven't found an ISO specification for the separator, so if that's out there, I may be able to use that as ammo to fix the real problem and follow the standard among the other components I am using.

Note, when I access a localized resource within the app, I do so via an auto-generated property in thedesigner.cs file, so I can't just replace "en-GB" with "en_GB".

share|improve this question
2  
The separator syntax is described in RFC 3066 - ietf.org/rfc/rfc3066.txt - chapter 2.1: Language tag syntax. I would strongly suggest to get rid of these funky underscores :-) –  Simon Mourier Nov 29 '12 at 16:42
    
This just isn't going to work, the resource manager will always use a dash, never an underscore to find the satellite assembly. This cannot be changed. Very unclear why this restriction exists, nothing that a simple String.Replace() couldn't fix. –  Hans Passant Nov 29 '12 at 17:18
    
Thanks Simon and Hans. Hopefully I can get the rest of the business to follow standard naming and use the "-". –  SirLanceAlot Nov 30 '12 at 17:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.