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I found two bubble algorithms but I not sure which one is right...

First example:

for (int i = 1; i < input.Length-1; i++)
    for (int j = 0; j < input.Length - 1 - i; j++)
        if (input[j] > input[j + 1])
            swap(input, j, j + 1);

Second example:

for (int i = 1; i < input.Length-1; i++)
    for (int j = 0; j < input.Length - 1; j++)
        if (input[j] > input[j + 1])
            swap(input, j, j + 1);

Wikipedia Example

For input: 5 1 4 2 8

First example: 6 comparisons

Second example: 12 comparisons

First Pass:

( 5 1 4 2 8 ) --> ( 1 5 4 2 8 ), Swap since 5 > 1

( 1 5 4 2 8 ) --> ( 1 4 5 2 8 ), Swap since 5 > 4

( 1 4 5 2 8 ) --> ( 1 4 2 5 8 ), Swap since 5 > 2

( 1 4 2 5 8 ) --> ( 1 4 2 5 8 )

Second Pass:

( 1 4 2 5 8 ) --> ( 1 4 2 5 8 )

( 1 4 2 5 8 ) --> ( 1 2 4 5 8 ), Swap since 4 > 2 <-- Example 1 stop here

( 1 2 4 5 8 ) --> ( 1 2 4 5 8 )

( 1 2 4 5 8 ) --> ( 1 2 4 5 8 )

Third Pass

( 1 2 4 5 8 ) --> ( 1 2 4 5 8 )

( 1 2 4 5 8 ) --> ( 1 2 4 5 8 )

( 1 2 4 5 8 ) --> ( 1 2 4 5 8 )

( 1 2 4 5 8 ) --> ( 1 2 4 5 8 ) <-- Example 2 stop here

Edit: when I say which one is right I mean which one is the original bubble sort

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Both examples are incorrect –  Egor Skriptunoff Nov 29 '12 at 17:12
    
@EgorSkriptunoff lol man they are not incorrect... They are from book... Wikipedia use too 2 loops –  a1204773 Nov 29 '12 at 17:13
    
Yes, both are correct. 1st one is optimized. When u go down the line you don't need to check the whole array since its tale is already sorted. –  Ε Г И І И О Nov 29 '12 at 17:48
    
@Loclip - Don't believe books. Use your brain instead. First example never touches last element of the array, so it fails on sorting {1,3,2}. Second example does too many redundant operations to be "correct". –  Egor Skriptunoff Nov 29 '12 at 18:01

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First algorithm is incorrect. It will fail if last element in the array is not the greatest.

Specifically, iteration on 'j':

for (int j = 0; j < input.Length - 1 - i; j++)

seems to skip last element. If your input is {0, 2, 2, 1} Then your input.Length = 4

for loop above will have condition j < 4 - 1 - i, where i = 1 so j < 4 - 1 - 1, so j < 2 so last j used will be j = 1, last comparison will be input[1] > input[2] -> input[3] is never compared.

you can fix it by changing for loop to j <= input.Length - 1 - i

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Just tested all works fine.. :D –  a1204773 Nov 29 '12 at 17:52
    
see my edit for details –  Jarek Kardas Nov 29 '12 at 17:57
    
you are right.. –  a1204773 Nov 29 '12 at 19:06

I found two bubble algorithms but I not sure which one is right..

I'm sure they're both right. The only difference is your second code has to loop through the sorted array one last time.

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Both are right.

First one is comparatively more efficient.

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Isn't first broken? It doesn't compare last element in the array. –  Jarek Kardas Nov 29 '12 at 18:11

without doing too much thinking, It looks like they're both correct, but the first one seems to do less redundant operations, and therefore takes less time to execute

The first seems to depend on the fact that your last i blocks are correct, therefore it doesn't even bother with them.

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In a bubble sort, after the first pass, you are guaranteed that the largest value will occupy the last position in the array. This is because by definition, the bubble sort swaps the highest value toward the end of the array.

This means that on the second pass, you do not need to compare the last value again, because it is guaranteed to be larger or equal to the element in the next lower index. Likewise, after pass 2, the top two elements will be the highest values and sorted relative to one another.

By extension, after i passes, the i top elements will be in their correct positions.

The first example takes this into account, by subtracting i from the maximum j iterator value. The second example unnecessarily compares the upper elements in subsequent passes. It doesn't hurt, but it is redundant, i.e. not optimized. It is still a bubble sort, because it is swapping adjacent values, moving the higher valued element toward the end of the array.

Does that make sense?

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Yes it does... Thanks for very good explanation.. –  a1204773 Nov 29 '12 at 17:28

The first one is what's called optimized bubble sort

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_sort#Optimizing_bubble_sort

the second one is the "classic" bubble sort.

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